Patch eye

Mkbtank

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Anybody have any good stories about Henry (Jafar)? He lives in my area and I see him often. I had seen him for years and played him a few times, not realizing that he is a player from way back, who has traveled the country and played some of the best. Since seeing an article about him (here I think) I have played him whenever I can and try to learn what I can. He plays slowly and is getting up there in years but I just love the fact that he has been around the game so long and must have been fantastic in his day. After all, I think BB cues where named from tony watching him in action somewhere.

So, one pocket historians? Any good patch eye stories??

Thanks!
 

fred bentivegna

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I played ole Patch many times. I knew him when his name was Henry. I have a page dedicated to him in my book, The Encyclopedia of Pool Hustlers.

Beard
 

Mkbtank

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It figures that you played him Freddy! (This is Mitch in Philly btw).

Steve- it was your article that made me realize what a cool (almost legendary) resource I had in my hall. Thanks for that.

Funny - about an hour after writing my post tonight, I ran into Henry at Fuscos.
 

Tom Wirth

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The first time I played him it was in Gentleman's Cue in Reisterstown, Md. in the seventies. I thought I was stealing. I won the first three games and that's when he turned on the juice. After a couple hours he had fought his way back to even and I couldn't believe how well this guy played One Pocket without the use of two eyes. We went back and forth for the next few hours as I remember it before we packed it in a called it a day. I didn't know of Patch Eye then, and at the time, I was playing some really good pool. There weren't but one or maybe two local players who I didn't have the best of during that period. He impressed me, no question about it.

Tom
 
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fred bentivegna

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It figures that you played him Freddy! (This is Mitch in Philly btw).

Steve- it was your article that made me realize what a cool (almost legendary) resource I had in my hall. Thanks for that.

Funny - about an hour after writing my post tonight, I ran into Henry at Fuscos.
Mitch, Patch was a tough old hombre. Played me on the 5 x 10s in Bensinger's -- one of a select few that would dare get up on those big bertha's.

Beard
 

JAM

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Patcheye came into the pool room I was working at. I usually worked graveyard shift, which is when the action would happen. ;)

Geese and I went to Philly one time looking for a game, and we saw Patcheye. Geese didn't want to tangle with him and said he preferred something a little easier. :D The pool room in Philly at that time was on the second floor. I can't remember the name of it, but you had to walk up stairs on the outside to get into the joint. Very strange pool room, at least I thought so, but what was worse is that there was only one way in and one way out. These are the kinds of things you notice about a joint when you're on the road. :eek:

One evening at the pool room I worked in (Champions in Silver Spring, MD), Patcheye sat near the counter, and we chatted a little bit. He was just getting ready to go on the road down South. Geese and I had just got back from being on the road down South, so I gave Patcheye a few places to check out for action. Most of them, he had heard of -- Baker's in Greensboro, NC, Baker's in Tampa, a place in Georgia with a mark named Rock Creek who'd go off for thousands, et cetera.

One place, however, Patcheye had not heard of. It was a tip given to Geese and me by Seattle Sam, which was a pool room in Morristown, TN. The Morristown pool room was located on the main strip in town. I can't remember the name of the pool room, but the owner's name was Frank. He loved action, and he invited any and all name-brand players to play him, always with a spot. He didn't care who you were. He enjoyed playing the big guns in front of a full crowd of onlookers. ;)

What was unique about the Morristown pool room is that it had an archery range inside where you could actually shoot arrows. I had never seen that before or since in a pool room, but I actully used to shoot archery the real way, not with a compound bow, and so I enjoyed that. While Geese was playing Frank, I was shooting arrows. :lol

Unfortunately, Geese, who had no stall capability in him, gave it all he had in three or four games. Though he gave Frank a spot, like most road players would do, he shot lights out, and Frank soon pulled up. So we made only a modest score of a few C-notes. Other players who came to play Frank would leave town with thousands.

Many years later, when I met Earl Strickland, I asked him if he had ever heard of this pool room in Morristown, and he knew it well. As it turned out, the owner Frankie was shot dead by his wife. There's a little more to that story, but it's non-pool-related. :eek:

Anyway, I gave Patcheye this Morristown steer. About 6 months later, I ran into Patcheye and asked him if he went to Morristown to play that owner, and he did. I was kind of hoping he'd give me a little jelly for the tip, but he didn't. I guess by this time, all that money won in Morristown was spent. :(

Also, it is AMAZING that Steve Booth got Patcheye's photo in his interview article. I saw Patcheye about 7 or 8 years ago at Drexeline Billiards in Drexel Hill, PA, and I asked him if I could take his photo, and he said no way. Like most road agents, he liked to fly under the radar.
 

mr3cushion

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The first time I played him it was in Gentleman's Cue in Reisterstown, Md. in the seventies. I thought I was stealing. I won the first three games and that's when he turned on the juice. After a couple hours he had fought his way back to even and I couldn't believe how well this guy played One Pocket without the use of two eyes. We went back and forth for the next few hours as I remember it before we backed it in a called it a day. I didn't know of Patch Eye then, and at the time, I was playing some really good pool. There weren't but one or maybe two local players who I didn't have the best of during that period. He impressed me, no question about it.

Tom
Tom; There was a 3 cushion player from Holland that had one eye, He also wore a eye patch. His name is Rini van Bracht, VERY good player, in fact, He was World Champion in 1982. The tournament was held in Ecuador that year.

With desire, and the miracle of the human body and knowledge, a person can overcome many physical issues in life when it comes to trying to achieve a goal.

Bill Smith "Mr3Cushion"
 

petie

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2 years ago at DCC Ghost and I were playing on the corner table in the green room. On the table that was next to us lengthwise was Ronnie Allen. Two tables over from that Patch Eye was playing Harry Platus for 200 a game. Patch Eye was in his mid 80's I think and beat Harry bad enough that Harry pulled up and asked for a spot. I forget what the spot was but it was too much for Patch. He lost. I didn't see the loss as Steve Booth and I went to dinner during the match. That's the kind of fun you can have at Derby City.
 

Tom Wirth

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2 years ago at DCC Ghost and I were playing on the corner table in the green room. On the table that was next to us lengthwise was Ronnie Allen. Two tables over from that Patch Eye was playing Harry Platus for 200 a game. Patch Eye was in his mid 80's I think and beat Harry bad enough that Harry pulled up and asked for a spot. I forget what the spot was but it was too much for Patch. He lost. I didn't see the loss as Steve Booth and I went to dinner during the match. That's the kind of fun you can have at Derby City.
Maybe he had to wear a second patch over the good eye. :D Well, maybe not.
 

Mkbtank

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Patcheye came into the pool room I was working at. I usually worked graveyard shift, which is when the action would happen. ;)

Geese and I went to Philly one time looking for a game, and we saw Patcheye. Geese didn't want to tangle with him and said he preferred something a little easier. :D The pool room in Philly at that time was on the second floor. I can't remember the name of it, but you had to walk up stairs on the outside to get into the joint. Very strange pool room, at least I thought so, but what was worse is that there was only one way in and one way out. These are the kinds of things you notice about a joint when you're on the road. :eek:
Jam-
thanks for the story.

That place was (gone now) called the boulevard social club. It used to be owned by Jim Hill. He also loved big action and word is the he lost enormously to busty and efron years back when they would come to town to play him (with big spots). And yeah..... Only one door.....
 

fred bentivegna

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2 years ago at DCC Ghost and I were playing on the corner table in the green room. On the table that was next to us lengthwise was Ronnie Allen. Two tables over from that Patch Eye was playing Harry Platus for 200 a game. Patch Eye was in his mid 80's I think and beat Harry bad enough that Harry pulled up and asked for a spot. I forget what the spot was but it was too much for Patch. He lost. I didn't see the loss as Steve Booth and I went to dinner during the match. That's the kind of fun you can have at Derby City.
They started out even and Patch made the mistake of eventually trying to spot Harry 9 to 6! A ridiculous spot. Of course he lost all the money back. I could never imagine the old Patch ever doing anything like that, from even to 9 to 6.

Beard
 

Tom Wirth

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I have little doubt Larry Neudecker and Patch Eye knew each other for years. I have equal confidence they had many opportunities where they matched up and tangled on the green rectangle. This reminds me of a game Larry envisioned and offered to one of the many suckers he played over the years. The negotiations for a game between these two players was going poorly. Back and forth they went with offers and counteroffers until Larry thought of Patch Eye. Big mistake here because Larry now offered to play this guy wearing a patch over one of his two good eyes and play even One Pocket. The game was on!

Larry was struggling right from the start. He had no depth perception having never attempted to play under circumstances such as these so he decided to create an edge for himself. Going to the bathroom he brought with him a pin and proceeded to poke holes in the patch allowing some light to flow through. It was not enough so he could actually see with that eye but he was hopeful that with a little glimmer of light he would be able to find that depth perception he had been missing.

All he succeeded in doing was give himself the biggest headache he had ever had. His straining the see out of the patched eye was too much for his brain to take and the losses of game after game kept mounting until he when broke. The last thing he said, " Anybody got some Perks?.

Tom
 

petie

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I have little doubt Larry Neudecker and Patch Eye knew each other for years. I have equal confidence they had many opportunities where they matched up and tangled on the green rectangle. This reminds me of a game Larry envisioned and offered to one of the many suckers he played over the years. The negotiations for a game between these two players was going poorly. Back and forth they went with offers and counteroffers until Larry thought of Patch Eye. Big mistake here because Larry now offered to play this guy wearing a patch over one of his two good eyes and play even One Pocket. The game was on!

Larry was struggling right from the start. He had no depth perception having never attempted to play under circumstances such as these so he decided to create an edge for himself. Going to the bathroom he brought with him a pin and proceeded to poke holes in the patch allowing some light to flow through. It was not enough so he could actually see with that eye but he was hopeful that with a little glimmer of light he would be able to find that depth perception he had been missing.

All he succeeded in doing was give himself the biggest headache he had ever had. His straining the see out of the patched eye was too much for his brain to take and the losses of game after game kept mounting until he when broke. The last thing he said, " Anybody got some Perks?.

Tom
I hope he took the patch off when he poked holes in it. Ouch!
 

Billy Jackets

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I can't remember the year I first met Patcheye, probably 1993 or so.
I played him 10 dollar one pocket on a gaffed up table I knew really well and he kept it close for a while.
I did surprise him with some of the kicks I made on that table and for a while I think he thought I played better than I really did.
My friend George Rood walked in and they knew each other very well and George told me how good Patch played straight pool at one time.
I thought he played pretty good one hole also.
He was one of the best combination makers I ever saw.
Goofy off angle stuff where you would think the cue ball would get loose, nope. He had whitey under control at all times.
I always took pictures of players and I asked Patch if I could take a couple and he declined, he said it was because of his religious beliefs and I am pretty sure that was the truth. He had no reason not to just tell me he wanted to stay undercover because we all wanted that.
He hung around making a few small scores for a week or so and we talked about all kinds of things , he is a very interesting insightful man and I think his biography would amaze people.
I saw Patcheye many times in the next 10 years and finally one day he said "I won't pose for a picture , but if you take them and I don't see you do it ,that would be ok .
They are a cherished part of my collection and I hope to see my old friend again.
We met in Springfield Ohio.
 

Mkbtank

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I can't remember the year I first met Patcheye, probably 1993 or so.
I played him 10 dollar one pocket on a gaffed up table I knew really well and he kept it close for a while.
I did surprise him with some of the kicks I made on that table and for a while I think he thought I played better than I really did.
My friend George Rood walked in and they knew each other very well and George told me how good Patch played straight pool at one time.
I thought he played pretty good one hole also.
He was one of the best combination makers I ever saw.
Goofy off angle stuff where you would think the cue ball would get loose, nope. He had whitey under control at all times.
I always took pictures of players and I asked Patch if I could take a couple and he declined, he said it was because of his religious beliefs and I am pretty sure that was the truth. He had no reason not to just tell me he wanted to stay undercover because we all wanted that.
He hung around making a few small scores for a week or so and we talked about all kinds of things , he is a very interesting insightful man and I think his biography would amaze people.
I saw Patcheye many times in the next 10 years and finally one day he said "I won't pose for a picture , but if you take them and I don't see you do it ,that would be ok .
They are a cherished part of my collection and I hope to see my old friend again.
We met in Springfield Ohio.
Great stories. Thanks. I should see Henry on Sunday and could pass regards if you like.
 

Scrzbill

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Patch

Patch

I met Henry, Patch Eye, in 1964 at the Parkmoor bowling lanes. Originally Parkmoor had a mini golf room in the back and then around New Years of 62 a giant fireball appeared in the night. Parkmoor burned to the ground. I was devastated because I was a pretty good bowler for a skinny 14 year old.
After they rebuilt the place with more lanes, a bar, restaurant, and POOL ROOM, I switched from bowling to pool. Carrying around a 16 lb ball was too much for the bus or walking.
In those days we played on Steepleton Tables that were 4x8's in little rooms all over town. Parkmoor was the class of pool, open 24 hours, action every night after 11 until 7am, and 41/2 X 9 GOLD CROWNS.
It wasn't long before I left my job racking balls in the South End at Whiteys, that I would head to Parkmoor.
Who was there? Glen Atwell, The Chinaman, John Elmers, and Patch, nearly every night. Glen would set up shots that couldn't be made and bet me 10 cents to a quarter he could make the shot. I guess it was his way of teaching me. Patch was always on the front table. Most nights playing Golf on the GC or banks with Bob Bolles or one pocket with John. I played him occasionally but I didn't understand spotting in those days so he would give me a ball or two and still rob me. John Elmers was my regular game and we played nine ball. He started out giving me the eight and eventually we played even.
In those days I was up for days it seemed, going from one room to the next always ending up at Parkmoor. The best players would always show up including Eddie Taylor who was good friends with Bob.
Eventually my father wanted me to go to college so he sent me packing. Not before I went on my first road trip. I can't remember the guy I went with but we went to Trumans house first in the country to pick him up. I didn't know Truman then but we spent about three weeks on the road with the three of us packed into my Corvair. I do remember the last night we were on the road. In Bowling Green, broke, sleeping in the car after playing John Edwards at his place. Big mistake.
I never called Henry Patch because I felt I didn't know him well enough. In those days in the south, disrespecting your elders got you shunned and then NO ACTION. So that was my first few years in pool at the greatest room for action I knew until the House of Billiards in Santa Monica. Parkmoor was closed by the time I got back to Louisville, at least the pool room.
I saw Patch at the DCC a few years back. He was having a tough time. He didn't remember me nor did I expect him too.
At the DCC in 2003 I was playing some straight back banker in the banks. He could not make anything else.
Shannon was on the front table and it was the morning matches with one pocket starting at one. I was up two games and my opponent broke dry. I ran five and out. Fking five and out and I'm just so happy with myself and the other TWO people watching. All of a sudden I hear this yell and screaming. The guy playing Truman has just run fourteen tying the match with Shannon and the crowd was crazy. But I just ran five, ANYONE? After the match I was looking at this guy who ran 14 and I sort of recognized him. Beer bottle in hand at noon. I asked a friend of mine who he was, Truman Hogue. I went over to him kind of sneaky like and whispered in his ear, you ever go on the road in a Red Corvair? He turned around and sure enough, he had.
Funny how things turn out. I cashed both one pocket and banks that year. Set in the seats and those days at the hotel, action was everywhere. I cleaned up in the stands and at night. But I could not return for years due to my injury. By then, I had no game. Now I go just to watch and see some friends.
 
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