Chicago cuemakers back in the day.

One Pocket Ghost

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From my picture files...in case anybody wants to know what they looked like, here's three Chicago cuemakers, and one transplanted Chicago cuemaker...


P.S Unfortunately I don't have a pic of Craig Peterson to add.

P.P.S. I owned a cue by 3 of the 4 mentioned guys - unfortunately I don't have any of those cues anymore 😣

>>>
 
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gulfportdoc

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Didn't Bobby Hunter move to Chicago several years back? He'd started making good poles in Carson City, NV.
 

lll

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Joe gold of cognoscenti cues is in Chicago too I think
 

lll

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Great pics ghost
i didn’t know kersonbrock was in Chicago
 
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baby huey

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These pioneers of cue making gave us (now) old timers an opportunity to expand our games by having our own cues. I remember well cherishing my first GINA cue which I purchased for $55 in 1966. A TAD around the same time was about $35. Slap on a Le Pro tip and you were gold. Those old Titlest one piece cues made great two piece cues. I still play with those Titlest conversions to this day. I have three of them and a couple of one piece cues ready for conversion right now. GHOST, you were quite the picture taker. Your files are full of some great photos. Thanks to you and a few others we are able to relive our past. Big Foot also falls into that category.
 

One Pocket Ghost

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These pioneers of cue making gave us (now) old timers an opportunity to expand our games by having our own cues. I remember well cherishing my first GINA cue which I purchased for $55 in 1966. A TAD around the same time was about $35. Slap on a Le Pro tip and you were gold. Those old Titlest one piece cues made great two piece cues. I still play with those Titlest conversions to this day. I have three of them and a couple of one piece cues ready for conversion right now. GHOST, you were quite the picture taker. Your files are full of some great photos. Thanks to you and a few others we are able to relive our past. Big Foot also falls into that category.
Yeah Jerry, I also paid about $50 for my Rambow...

As for all my pics, thanks, glad you like them, but I took some of them, but not all of them...and as for my picture files...

I like to collect pics of things that I like and am interested in, so, thanks to modern technology, I probably have about 8,000 pics in my picture files, covering many, many, interests: to name a few: pool of course, art, photography, architecture, nature (in all of it's forms - fauna, flora, landscapes, skies, oceans, etc. etc.), history, books, vintage+exotic+rare cars, portraits, humor, etc. etc...

Over the years I've thought about posting up some of these pics in the members section in an ongoing thread...but I didn't know if there was enough interest, so I never have...maybe I still will.

P.S. Doc & Larry....of course Bobby (in more recent years) and Joey (always) are Chicago cuemakers, among others....but I was only putting up pics (more rare pics) of back-in-the-day cuemakers - Kersonbrock, not so old, but it's rare to get a pic of him cuz he's a reclusive guy.
 

Shortstop

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P.S Unfortunately I don't have a pic of Craig Peterson to add
Ghost...He very reclusive ..Had his shop in the back of Howard/Paulina pool room...Also lived & slept there,i believe.
year...
[/QUOTE]

Ghost, do you know if Ed Young is still Dave's shopmate? About 20 years ago Ed made the tiny-tipped shaft that I still play (badly) with - only took him a year...
I`m wondering the same??..I bought an Ed Young about the same time,with 2 shafts..1-billiard & 1-pool...I was told the shafts were from Burt Spain & Kersonbrock brought them,when he partnered up with Ed??
,
 

One Pocket Ghost

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Pat & Steve....I haven't seen Ed Young around for many years, so I don't know what's up with him nowadays.
 

mr3cushion

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From the late 60's to the mid 80's, Craig Peterson made as good a handmade cue as anyone in the business. His shop for many years was up in, 'Howard &* Paulina Billiards'. Craig looked a lot like Jeff Foxworthy, since I also don't have a photo of him.
 

Ratamon

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Thanks for the very nice pics Ghost. I do not recall seeing any pictures of Craig in any catalogues/magazines but I did own one of his cues a while ago.

I believe his name is Craig T. Petersen (September 06, 1945 - March 16, 1992).

Here's an extract from the Bluebook of Pool Cues, 3rd Edition:

Craig Petersen started making cues as a teenager around 1963. He had learned to play pool at the YMCA in Evanston, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. He soon became fascinated with cues, and started doing repairs in a local pool room. Soon, he had a full service shop in that room, but later ended up working in the cue department at Brunswick.

In 1967, Craig got married and moved to California. He was away from cuemaking for the next eight years, returning to Chicago in 1975. For the next ten years, Craig worked off and on for some of the top Chicago area cuemakers.

In 1985, he opened a shop of his own in Bartlett, Illinois. This shop relocated to Addison, Illinois in 1988, and to Fort Wayne, Indiana in 1990. Craig died unexpectedly in 1992, at the age of 46, having made less than one thousand cues. At the time of his death, Craig was in the process of completing his first five-point cue.
Today, Craig Petersen cues are sought after by cue collectors around the world. Later cues are easily identifiable by a "C.P." logo on their butt caps. Craig was famous for extremely sharp and even points. Also, he had a talent for getting inlays, rings, and points to line up perfectly. This was amazing, considering that all work was done by hand with very little equipment. Cues with piloted joints have very thick joints, usually of stainless steel, with very thin pilots.

Craig was a very influential cuemaker whose designs bridged the gap between traditional cues and cutting edge contemporary inlay patterns. Craig's design and construction influence can be seen in many of today's cues and he had a profound direct influence on the early work of Joe Gold of Cognoscenti Cues because of his having trained Joe in the late 1980s.
 

mr3cushion

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This I can say positively, I worked side by side with Craig Peterson on a lathe making cues for, National Billiard & Chalk at Damen and Futon in Chicago in 1967. Craig was really the TOP cue maker and designer there, Dick Helmsteter was just in charge, after a coupe of years Dick went on to Adam cues of Japan. I also know for a fact, that Craig had his shop on the second floor of, Howard & Paulina Billiards owned by Bob Segal, who in 1970 bought, Clark Diversey (Bensingers) from Artie. I don't remember Craig ever leaving to go California.
 

mr3cushion

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Eddie Laube, with his pet parakeet :)View attachment 4313921970Bensinger's Tournament3.jpg
Eddie Laube revolutionized custom cue prices in the early/mid 60's, by charging over, $300.00 for a cue with 2 shafts. Some of the first cues he made were a set of 5 identical cues. A butt of rosewood, no wrap, with ivory and red dots on the forearm and rear butt. These cues were made for, Bud Harris, (City Champion at the time), Dick Lagonle, my Dad, Merhl Smith, Tommy Lutzke, and Ronnie Rosario. Here's a photo of my Dad, (in foreground) and Bud Harris with these cues, playing in an event at Bensingers in 1970.
 

ChicagoFats

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I think Steve(can't recall his last name at the moment) let me hit with a Kersonbrock when I was like 17 at Carlo's Billiard Academy. If I remember it right, he let me break a 9 ball rack with it which i was surprised. However I did buy a nice Schuler from him before this. I broke and ran out 3 racks then gave it back to him. This was on huge pocket gold crowns so don't get in a tiffy. I should have bought it on the spot, but it was probably more than I had in my pocket.
 

One Pocket Ghost

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I slept Ray Schuler when I put up this thread - surprising since in return for my help in promoting his Schuler cues to pool players (early on it was mostly all 3cushion players who were playing with his cues), Ray made me a custom cue to my specs for free - I played with that Schuler cue for about 15 years - Ray made an excellent cue, and like Eddie Laube, he was innovative, with the excellent piloted, wood-to-wood joint that he developed....

...here's a pic of Ray with another Ray who had a little bit of talent ;) when it came to pool cues -> very nice guy, and one of the greatest 3cushion players/champions of all time, Raymond Ceulemans >>>
 
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