"Pinning the cueball"

pablocruz

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Nov 12, 2011
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I read where John said to not be scared and come in and join!
Can someone explain this term to me!!
 

Fast Lenny

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Pinning the cue ball happens where a player holds his tip to the cue ball to trap it to a corner of a pocket facing usually, it is deemed illegal in most tournaments.
 

NH Steve

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The way that The US Open One Pocket (under Mark Griffin's CSI/PlayBCA umbrella) handles it is this:
5-12 Deliberately Trapping or Wedging the Cue Ball
It is a foul if you use an illegal stroke to deliberately attempt to trap or wedge the cue ball in the jaw of a pocket. In addition to the one ball penalty for a foul, your opponent receives ball in hand behind the head string.

Our own official rules here on OnePocket.org:
6.6 Intentional fouls are an accepted part of One Pocket tactics as long as they are played by use of a legal stroke, such as by lightly touching the cue ball with the cue tip; by rolling the cue ball to a new location without regard for legal contact with either an object ball or a cushion; by pocket scratching the cue ball; or by using a legal jump technique to force the cue ball off the table. However, if the acting official rules that a player has used an illegal technique to direct the cue ball or any object balls to a more desirable location, then the incoming player has the option of either playing the balls where they lie, or requesting the official to restore all such moved balls to their location prior to the illegal maneuver. The offending player is charged the standard one ball foul penalty, and in addition may be further penalized at the discretion of the acting official under the general rules of unsportsmanlike conduct.

This is one of those rules that we may want to specifically change in our rules, to calling the foul and giving the option of playing where they lie or ball in hand behind the head string.
 

Fast Lenny

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The way that The US Open One Pocket (under Mark Griffin's CSI/PlayBCA umbrella) handles it is this:


Our own official rules here on OnePocket.org:


This is one of those rules that we may want to specifically change in our rules, to calling the foul and giving the option of playing where they lie or ball in hand behind the head string.
I like the cue ball in hand behind the head string as an option for sure.
 

wincardona

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Aug 7, 2007
Messages
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Dallas Tx.
The way that The US Open One Pocket (under Mark Griffin's CSI/PlayBCA umbrella) handles it is this:


Our own official rules here on OnePocket.org:


This is one of those rules that we may want to specifically change in our rules, to calling the foul and giving the option of playing where they lie or ball in hand behind the head string.

I agree, ball in hand behind the head string is the perfect solution for all "trapping the cue ball" shots. Which should apply to intentional, and unintentional trapping of the cue ball. Leave nothing to discretion, and adopt a black and white rule.

Dr. Bill
 

lfigueroa

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Jul 17, 2004
Messages
1,952
That's not what this is about.

Over on the udder place CJ Wiley has the natives in a stir over this uber-secret double-aught technique the pros call "pinning the cue ball." (He also says he has been voted one of the top three most feared money players of all time, but let's save that one.)

In the general order he posted them, here are excerpts from several posts he made attempting to explain this technique:

#####

Yes, I'm glad you're looking at the Filipinos because they perform this technique very well. Bustemante looks like he's drawing the ball and then comes up on the center to apply the "topspin".

Imagine trying to put maximum topspin on a tennis ball, would you start below center and come up to apply maximum spin? You can do this with the top of the tip like it's a "Pin".

There's something special about using and playing with the TOP of your tip that we call "Pinning" the ball. If you've never heard this term, then you are getting into some knowledge that will do wonders for your game.

When you start "Pinning" the cue ball it reacts with "pinpoint" accuracy and you can draw and follow the ball with ease. 'The Game is the Teacher'

When you think of "Pinning" the cue ball, it may help to think of hitting a very specific spot just inside of center (low, medium or high). This technique will only make sense if you play for a few hours focusing on hitting the cue ball with the top portion of the tip.

This is very tricky to explain and I want you to get it, but please understand players feel this in unique and different ways. I know that sounds like a "cop out", but this particular technique is strickly pro level.

Try to practice aiming at the bottom of the cue ball and following (applying follow english or topspin) a straight in shot a couple of feet. You'll have to hit the shot firmly and FORCE it to go forward by coming up on the ball with the top of your tip.

You will have to use your hand to accelerate enough to do as I"m saying. Again, the "Pinning" technique I only discussed with top notch road players, so I don't want to dwell on it.

If you get it you will see how accurate it makes your stroke and you start "Pinning" shots. I wish I could do a live seminar on this subject with everyone interested because I know if you see me do it you will become clear.

Watch Efren, Bustemante or Kiamco in the post above and watch how he comes up on the cue ball to follow the ball.

I"m saying they cue the ball low, almost to the botton and come up to create topspin or what's called "high english".

This gets a different reaction than simply hitting it above center, instead it's used to "Pin" the ball. The cue when this is done will naturally be close to level, but it won't start out that way, that's why you can see the tip is coming up to impart topspin.

"Pinning" is a term often used by the one handed champions. They have to perform this technique to maneuver the cue ball around without using a bridge OR a rail. This is MUCH more difficult than playing with two hands.

I traveled with Jr. Weldon, who many considered one of the all time greatest one handed players and he showed me this technique when I was 19. It was incredible how well he played one handed "jacked up" and could draw his ball the length of the table "jacked up" using no bridge and no rail.

He used to look at me after he shot something like that, smile, and say "I pinned that one didnt' I?" And of course he knew he had indeed "Pinned it". 'The Game is the Teacher'

If you put your tip square up to the center it would be contacting the center of your tip. When you put your tip below center, and keep the same cue angle the top of the tip is contacting the cue ball.

When you hit the cue ball with this angle and using the top of your tip it gives you a different type hit. This hit, we road player call "Pinning" and it is a more precise way to play. There's more benefits once you get the hang of this and I'll answer questions until you understand it better.
#####

Knock yourselves out.

Lou Figueroa
 

gulfportdoc

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Jun 25, 2004
Messages
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Gulfport, Mississippi
SKEPTIC ALERT!! I'd have to see a Dr. Dave video on that one, Lou. You know, more than most, that the CB reacts only to the velocity and location of the hit, along with the mass of the first few inches of the ferrule and shaft. The CB does not know how it was stroked.

If somehow the cue tip was dragged along the surface of the CB, then that might influence the spin, but then that would be a double hit. But when one is using, say, bottom english, he's already utilizing the top of the tip. When the top of the tip runs out of CB surface due to its curvature, there's a miscue.

I do recall an old Bert Kinister tape from 15 years or more ago where he may have addressed this technique, but I might be remembering more of a BHE type method.

Doc
 

jrhendy

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May 24, 2004
Messages
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Placerville, CA
That's not what this is about.

Over on the udder place CJ Wiley has the natives in a stir over this uber-secret double-aught technique the pros call "pinning the cue ball." (He also says he has been voted one of the top three most feared money players of all time, but let's save that one.)

In the general order he posted them, here are excerpts from several posts he made attempting to explain this technique:

#####

Yes, I'm glad you're looking at the Filipinos because they perform this technique very well. Bustemante looks like he's drawing the ball and then comes up on the center to apply the "topspin".

Imagine trying to put maximum topspin on a tennis ball, would you start below center and come up to apply maximum spin? You can do this with the top of the tip like it's a "Pin".

There's something special about using and playing with the TOP of your tip that we call "Pinning" the ball. If you've never heard this term, then you are getting into some knowledge that will do wonders for your game.

When you start "Pinning" the cue ball it reacts with "pinpoint" accuracy and you can draw and follow the ball with ease. 'The Game is the Teacher'

When you think of "Pinning" the cue ball, it may help to think of hitting a very specific spot just inside of center (low, medium or high). This technique will only make sense if you play for a few hours focusing on hitting the cue ball with the top portion of the tip.

This is very tricky to explain and I want you to get it, but please understand players feel this in unique and different ways. I know that sounds like a "cop out", but this particular technique is strickly pro level.

Try to practice aiming at the bottom of the cue ball and following (applying follow english or topspin) a straight in shot a couple of feet. You'll have to hit the shot firmly and FORCE it to go forward by coming up on the ball with the top of your tip.

You will have to use your hand to accelerate enough to do as I"m saying. Again, the "Pinning" technique I only discussed with top notch road players, so I don't want to dwell on it.

If you get it you will see how accurate it makes your stroke and you start "Pinning" shots. I wish I could do a live seminar on this subject with everyone interested because I know if you see me do it you will become clear.

Watch Efren, Bustemante or Kiamco in the post above and watch how he comes up on the cue ball to follow the ball.

I"m saying they cue the ball low, almost to the botton and come up to create topspin or what's called "high english".

This gets a different reaction than simply hitting it above center, instead it's used to "Pin" the ball. The cue when this is done will naturally be close to level, but it won't start out that way, that's why you can see the tip is coming up to impart topspin.

"Pinning" is a term often used by the one handed champions. They have to perform this technique to maneuver the cue ball around without using a bridge OR a rail. This is MUCH more difficult than playing with two hands.

I traveled with Jr. Weldon, who many considered one of the all time greatest one handed players and he showed me this technique when I was 19. It was incredible how well he played one handed "jacked up" and could draw his ball the length of the table "jacked up" using no bridge and no rail.

He used to look at me after he shot something like that, smile, and say "I pinned that one didnt' I?" And of course he knew he had indeed "Pinned it". 'The Game is the Teacher'

If you put your tip square up to the center it would be contacting the center of your tip. When you put your tip below center, and keep the same cue angle the top of the tip is contacting the cue ball.

When you hit the cue ball with this angle and using the top of your tip it gives you a different type hit. This hit, we road player call "Pinning" and it is a more precise way to play. There's more benefits once you get the hang of this and I'll answer questions until you understand it better.
#####

Knock yourselves out.

Lou Figueroa

I have tried this version of "Pinning" and usually end up jumping the cue ball. This might be a secret the Ghost used when he beat me playing one pocket at Ca Billiards.:heh
 

One Pocket Ghost

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May 25, 2004
Messages
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Ghosttown
I have tried this version of "Pinning" and usually end up jumping the cue ball. This might be a secret the Ghost used when he beat me playing one pocket at Ca Billiards..:heh



Nah, he probably "jarred" your Red Bull...:D

Doc


Nope, don't no nothin' about any fancy systems....I just did it the old fashioned One Pocket way - by outmoving my opponent...:heh

- Gho$t

PS, Btw Doc...impossible to jar John - when gambling, he always uses either Bill or Ronnie as a taste-tester on all his drinks...:frus
 

Jimmy B

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Joined
Aug 17, 2007
Messages
5,733
I agree, ball in hand behind the head string is the perfect solution for all "trapping the cue ball" shots. Which should apply to intentional, and unintentional trapping of the cue ball. Leave nothing to discretion, and adopt a black and white rule.

Dr. Bill

Yep. Remember we had that come up at the last Derby City and discussed it. It was a bank match. Earls opponent (Piggy B ??) did it and got away with it because he hit the cue ball and then followed thru and jammed it into the facing, as though it was an accident. He did NOT push the cue ball into the place by leaving the tip in contact with the cue ball, so the ref said no problem. Just an ordinary foul. I agree with Dr. Bill as usual. (but I'm no fluffer so don't start up with me)
 

newfosgatesucks

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Nov 23, 2006
Messages
858
Without getting deep....
Without whipping out the science...
Without a doubt.....

Don't buy it. Been there, studied that.
 

CJ Wiley

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Mar 17, 2013
Messages
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Top Secret

Top Secret

That's not what this is about.

Over on the udder place CJ Wiley has the natives in a stir over this uber-secret double-aught technique the pros call "pinning the cue ball." (He also says he has been voted one of the top three most feared money players of all time, but let's save that one.)

In the general order he posted them, here are excerpts from several posts he made attempting to explain this technique:

#####

Yes, I'm glad you're looking at the Filipinos because they perform this technique very well. Bustemante looks like he's drawing the ball and then comes up on the center to apply the "topspin".

Imagine trying to put maximum topspin on a tennis ball, would you start below center and come up to apply maximum spin? You can do this with the top of the tip like it's a "Pin".

There's something special about using and playing with the TOP of your tip that we call "Pinning" the ball. If you've never heard this term, then you are getting into some knowledge that will do wonders for your game.

When you start "Pinning" the cue ball it reacts with "pinpoint" accuracy and you can draw and follow the ball with ease. 'The Game is the Teacher'

When you think of "Pinning" the cue ball, it may help to think of hitting a very specific spot just inside of center (low, medium or high). This technique will only make sense if you play for a few hours focusing on hitting the cue ball with the top portion of the tip.

This is very tricky to explain and I want you to get it, but please understand players feel this in unique and different ways. I know that sounds like a "cop out", but this particular technique is strickly pro level.

Try to practice aiming at the bottom of the cue ball and following (applying follow english or topspin) a straight in shot a couple of feet. You'll have to hit the shot firmly and FORCE it to go forward by coming up on the ball with the top of your tip.

You will have to use your hand to accelerate enough to do as I"m saying. Again, the "Pinning" technique I only discussed with top notch road players, so I don't want to dwell on it.

If you get it you will see how accurate it makes your stroke and you start "Pinning" shots. I wish I could do a live seminar on this subject with everyone interested because I know if you see me do it you will become clear.

Watch Efren, Bustemante or Kiamco in the post above and watch how he comes up on the cue ball to follow the ball.

I"m saying they cue the ball low, almost to the botton and come up to create topspin or what's called "high english".

This gets a different reaction than simply hitting it above center, instead it's used to "Pin" the ball. The cue when this is done will naturally be close to level, but it won't start out that way, that's why you can see the tip is coming up to impart topspin.

"Pinning" is a term often used by the one handed champions. They have to perform this technique to maneuver the cue ball around without using a bridge OR a rail. This is MUCH more difficult than playing with two hands.

I traveled with Jr. Weldon, who many considered one of the all time greatest one handed players and he showed me this technique when I was 19. It was incredible how well he played one handed "jacked up" and could draw his ball the length of the table "jacked up" using no bridge and no rail.

He used to look at me after he shot something like that, smile, and say "I pinned that one didnt' I?" And of course he knew he had indeed "Pinned it". 'The Game is the Teacher'

If you put your tip square up to the center it would be contacting the center of your tip. When you put your tip below center, and keep the same cue angle the top of the tip is contacting the cue ball.

When you hit the cue ball with this angle and using the top of your tip it gives you a different type hit. This hit, we road player call "Pinning" and it is a more precise way to play. There's more benefits once you get the hang of this and I'll answer questions until you understand it better.
#####

Knock yourselves out.

Lou Figueroa

I don't know what I was thinking when I released this TOP SECRET information, hopefully it went unnoticed.
click Top Secret at your own risk
 

tylerdurden

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Joined
Oct 1, 2011
Messages
1,959
Yep. Remember we had that come up at the last Derby City and discussed it. It was a bank match. Earls opponent (Piggy B ??) did it and got away with it because he hit the cue ball and then followed thru and jammed it into the facing, as though it was an accident. He did NOT push the cue ball into the place by leaving the tip in contact with the cue ball, so the ref said no problem. Just an ordinary foul. I agree with Dr. Bill as usual. (but I'm no fluffer so don't start up with me)

Lol. I just so happen to agree with him often as well. You can call me a fluffer though. Bill probably has an analytical/logical (opposite of women) mind. You probably do too Jimmy.
 

jtompilot

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Feb 17, 2009
Messages
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New Orleans
That's a funny one Lou. It works in tennis because both the ball and racket strings compress, the tennis ball stays on the strings a long time.
 

Cowboy Dennis

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Dec 16, 2008
Messages
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Detroit,Michigan
The "hackers" on here just aren't privy to this info. Why he's waking the dead I don't know. :frus
Rod.

The Duck & I are working on a theory too, trying to prove that it's to your advantage to drink mucho alcohol before & during a match:). We'll get back to you when the testing is done and the theory is proved/disproved:D.

RBL
 
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