Mentor

Scrzbill

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Feb 8, 2011
Messages
3,957
Location
Eagles Rest, Wa
One pocket has a large learning curve for most of us. Others they see the table and instinctively know the game. T-Rex was the latter. I am one of the ones that is still learning. I have been lucky in my pool efforts to have had mentor for the past thirty years. I have given John Henderson that dubious honor since I saw him play at California (Safeway)Billiards. I knew him from around. John carried himself as a gentleman first, a pool player next. I wanted that and I wanted his knowledge. He was a barker and so am I and we started off at 10-7. Sometimes I would go for a complete flyer because having four or five and if I made the flyer..........Well of course ten to John was a spot shot. He would make one, two, three and on his way. That big broad stoke, banking, combos, POW, POW. Now its 8-5 and we both need two. My end game wasn’t too bad but it got a whole lot better. It’s not about making one safety, its about making ten. Because that is how many times you have to play safe to get a shot. Unless you gave one up in those ten. Anyway John taught me more than playing, he taught me how to respect the game and those playing it. I don’t think they will ever call me gentleman Bill, but I have a mentor.
 

ChicagoFats

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Feb 1, 2017
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853
I learn a lot from this group of guys. I appreciate this forum and the opportunity to meet all the 1p.org participants.
 

BRLongArm

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Feb 19, 2006
Messages
861
Great writeup for John. He has helped many West Coast players with their game. A great ambassador for one pocket.
 

jrhendy

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Joined
May 24, 2004
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4,871
Location
Placerville, CA
Thanks Bill, at first I was just trying to ‘Mentor’ you out of your money, but we became great friends over the years, and have had many pool trips around the country playing, streaming and meeting new friends. I sure hope we get to do it some more before we hang up our cues.

Proud to call you my friend.
 

crabbcatjohn

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Joined
Nov 30, 2014
Messages
3,339
Location
Benton, Ky.
My one pocket mentor was Jimmy "The Hat" Berkley. I was actually playing one pocket in Nashville with 12squared when I got the call from the pool room he had passed. They were looking to me for finding his relatives to notify them.
 

12squared

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Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Messages
2,394
Location
Fort Collins, CO
My one pocket mentor was Jimmy "The Hat" Berkley. I was actually playing one pocket in Nashville with 12squared when I got the call from the pool room he had passed. They were looking to me for finding his relatives to notify them.
I remember how the sad news affected you during our set, it was clear what Jimmy meant to you. Although it ended our session earlier than planned, it was still one of my most enjoyable one pocket sessions. It was so nice of you to go out of your way to pick me up and take the time to play.

Thanks again.
Dave
 

1 HOLE NUT

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Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
128
Location
Biloxi, Ms.
Biloxi Mike Surber was my mentor, and I never thought I would have another till I found this group, all you guys help me get better. There is one guy that even though I give him weight, and get the best of most of the time, if it was not for him I would not be posting on here and traveling around the country to play with all you guys, he has kept 1 pkt, my passion since Mike's passing, we have played hours and hours of just 1 pkt, every now and then I try him some banks just to humble him;). Col. Bille has helped my game more than anyone else, usually my thanks is me taking his cabbage, but, he knows that has helped us grow as players, he's gotten ten times better, and im ten times fatter(literally). Merry Christmas/Happy New Years to him and his family, and to all of yall as well.
 

youngstownkid

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Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
1,642
My mentor would be Bubba, aka Shawn Putnam, and Tom Wirth via his book. Before reading that, and playing with Shawn, I just didn’t get it. Others have tried mentoring me before his book came out, but I just wasn’t ready. Not that I know what I’m doing now, but at least i enjoy trying now, and that’s all that really matters. Knowing what to do is only one aspect of playing the game, being able to execute it is what separates most of us. That’s why Filler beat Chohan, and why we always read/hear about the Shooter/Mover arguments. But if you don’t know what you’re doing, it’s just not fun.
 

cincy_kid

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Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
5,619
Location
Northern KY
My one pocket mentor would have to be Ricky Carrelli, a Cincinnati shortstop who is a good friend of mine. Although I got to play with and learned from Gary Spaeth and a little from Steve Cook over the years, Ricky was by far who I played the most with and learned the most from. I hope once this covid clears up to be able to play some more with him for old times sake!
 

beatle

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Joined
Jun 21, 2009
Messages
2,960
i never had a mentor. when and where i learned, no one and i mean no one, that was better than you ever gave out any pointers or helped you. and i was semi friends with some top players. it was the way it was. so i learned each thing on my own to get better. luckily i was smarter, which is easy for a pool room, than the others there, and made games that i won all the time at.
i learnt the why's of what i do after the internet came along and that did help immensely.

but the whole secret of pool is to get a stroke you can repeat every time under pressure if pressure affects you.. same as golf or most any sport.
and a pool stroke is easier to learn and get than about any other sport, as its really only one fluid motion with little timing.
sorry to burst anyone's bubble on that.
 
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jtompilot

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Feb 17, 2009
Messages
4,619
Location
New Orleans
Although several players in Phoenix wanted to play me 1P, I didn’t like the game at that time. I’d have to say that Cue and Cushion in St. Louis was my first mentor. I used to fly there on a regular basis in the 80’s. The local gang just took my money but I started finding the game of my life.

When I moved to Detroit in 96 my 1P started becoming my game of choice. I met Leil Gay on the Viking tour and we became friends. Leil would play me for $5 a game even, I don’t think I ever won a game but it started me down the path. RIP Leil
 

jrhendy

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Joined
May 24, 2004
Messages
4,871
Location
Placerville, CA
My mentor was a small Filipino man they called ‘Dado’. He taught me by taking my money for $5 a game on a 5 x 10 snooker table in the mid 50’s. I was a snooker player first, and did not play much on 4 1/2 x 9 tables for several years. He took me on a few short road trips a few miles from home, and I got a little taste of what life was like in other pool rooms.

I really did not have any idea how good he played until I was scuffling myself and watched him play Marvin Henderson getting 9/7 and hanging in their for what was serious money in those days. I think one of the first guys I gambled with playing one pocket other than Dado, was ‘Artesia’ Kenny Dodd down at The Billiard Palace in Bellflower. I believe Kenny is still knocking them around up in Oregon.
 

lll

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Joined
Mar 19, 2007
Messages
16,346
Location
vero beach fl
i never got to play much onepocket once i learned about it and got addicted to it
so my early mentors were the accustats commentators ie billy incardona/grady/freddy
then all the vhs tapes i watched from grady/billy incardona willie jopling
and books
i also must say thank you to all the members of the site from the old days who answered my questions with patience and never made me feel embarrassed for my shot selections and did their best to help me learn(rodney was among those members..thanks rod.
too many others to list)
since i have started playing more
tom wirth has helped alot although i dont get to spend enough time with him
and mark coats my house pro really has spent alot of time with me
since covid i have been playing with jeff dovinsky
some of you might know of his brother john (R.I.P.)who i understand was pretty sporty player
i still need alot of "seasoning"
and more skill would help too :cry: LOL
 
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sorackem

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Joined
Dec 4, 2019
Messages
887
Location
N.CA
Just to add some content to this topic:
I can't really say I've had a mentor per-say, but a couple unofficial benefactors.
The stance, stroke and mechanics I taught myself. The basics seemed intuitive. Stance, arm position for a free and repeatable level stroke, sighting, etc.
The help I got when I first started (becoming serious rather than a bar-banger) was in learning the rules of the game, how to recognize run patterns, etc. George Pells was that fellow. Well liked and respected in our little pool-hall.
After that, Robert Byrne's 'Standard Book of Pool and Billiards' was a great help and really cemented concepts that helped me understand and improve quickly.
Then, more recently, after a 10 year lay-off, at Hard Times, I spent a lot of time playing a distinctly unique individual who has as much love for cue-sports as anyone possibly could; Art. He wasn't competing in tournaments or wagers as far as I know, but plays for the sheer joy of playing. He's free to play very creative shots and really opened my eyes to looking for unique opportunities. Frequently astounding me with, not fliers or whimsical shots, but very workable 'though unusual shots - that he (nor I) might not really choose to play in a serious contest. But he expanded my imagination with sound concepts. He moved balls around a One Pocket table pretty good.

One day about 6 months before the closures, I mentioned to Oscar Dominguez that I would appreciate it if I could arrange some time to get some pointers from him sometime in the near future. A couple weeks later one morning, as I was shooting in the back room with only a couple tables going he walks up and says "I've got a few minutes.." He spent 45 minutes with me covering about 5 or 6 perfectly tailored advanced adjustments and recommendations to my play. He had watched me play enough to know exactly what he was going to cover with me and did so in a very easily understood and efficient way. I spent the next two months playing as much as I could alone to work through and integrate his lessons until they seemed like they were always part of my game. It improved my play immensely. If anyone around Sacramento ever wants help - I can tell you - Oscar is a very effective coach, and one of the nicest people you'll ever meet.
 
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