Weenie Beenie: A Classy Pool Player

JAM

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In perusing my pool print periodicals, magazines, newspapers, et cetera, from the '70s, '80s, and '90s, I get stuck every now and then when I come across a gem.

In the January 1984 issue of National Tavern News, there's an 8-page article written by Bill Pierce entitled "WEENIE BEENIE: A Classy Pool Player." I created a Wikipedia article about Bill Staton, and so I had to go through this pool print media piece just in case there was some good data to contribute to Wikipedia.

When asked "What was your best game?" Beenie replied, My best game was one pocket. I learned from a guy named FITZPATRICK. They called him "BUGS," and he was one of the greatest. He died in 1960, but I cut my teeth on guys like Earl Schriver, Rags, Eddie Taylor, and Squirrel. They were my teachers.

In my area, I grew up seeing the Weenie Beenie hot dog stands. In fact, there's still a few of them around in Northern Virginia, Arlington to be exact. Bill Staton was an all-around gambler, whether it was cards, golf, or pool. He owned the infamous pool room named Jack and Jill's in Arlington, Virginia, which was a road player's stop to get action. Oh, if those walls could talk!

What Weenie Beenie said about Detroit. :eek: I quit playing pool from 1972 to 1976. One day I received a call, and this guy told me they were playing pretty high in Detroit, and I had a chance to make some big money if I would go up there. So I went up there. I played and I won. That was my first time up there.

Later I went back , and I lost everything I had won -- plus considerably more. And this is funny. After I lost all the money I had with me, I called my wife and told her to bring some money up to me. She did, and I lost all of that. Now I had flown up there to begin with, so when I called her next time, I told her to bring more money, but to drive because I needed transportation to get around.

In the meantime, I had borrowed some money, so when she got there, I paid off my debts and then proceeded to lose the rest. I played one game for my car and lost it (about 10 minutes). So Dear Momma brought more money. She did. I bought my car back, but I guess I don't have to tell you that I lost all that money too, plus the car again. So I said, "Good-bye Boys. I can no longer afford you," and I went home.


There aren't too many player who can laugh about a big loss like this. Does anybody remember his time in Detroit?

I saw Weenie Beenie play a local, Freddie Boggs, in Arlington, Virginia, $500 a game one pocket. It was after his prime, sometime in the mid to late '80s. It was like a cameo appearance having him in the pool room. We all drove over to check out the festivities. Weenie came there to play one pocket, but Freddie, a good one-hole player in his own right, took too long between shots, studying them, analyzing them, and Weenie Beenie pulled up after the first game. He just didn't like the pace of the game. :eek:

I saw him later in 2002 with Keith at the U.S. Open, and I sat down with him to chat. He was moving kind of slow, but he seemed content to be a railbird, sweating the U.S. Open matches. He was definitely one of the great ones.
 

petie

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Oct 2, 2005
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In perusing my pool print periodicals, magazines, newspapers, et cetera, from the '70s, '80s, and '90s, I get stuck every now and then when I come across a gem.

In the January 1984 issue of National Tavern News, there's an 8-page article written by Bill Pierce entitled "WEENIE BEENIE: A Classy Pool Player." I created a Wikipedia article about Bill Staton, and so I had to go through this pool print media piece just in case there was some good data to contribute to Wikipedia.

When asked "What was your best game?" Beenie replied, My best game was one pocket. I learned from a guy named FITZPATRICK. They called him "BUGS," and he was one of the greatest. He died in 1960, but I cut my teeth on guys like Earl Schriver, Rags, Eddie Taylor, and Squirrel. They were my teachers.

In my area, I grew up seeing the Weenie Beenie hot dog stands. In fact, there's still a few of them around in Northern Virginia, Arlington to be exact. Bill Staton was an all-around gambler, whether it was cards, golf, or pool. He owned the infamous pool room named Jack and Jill's in Arlington, Virginia, which was a road player's stop to get action. Oh, if those walls could talk!

What Weenie Beenie said about Detroit. :eek: I quit playing pool from 1972 to 1976. One day I received a call, and this guy told me they were playing pretty high in Detroit, and I had a chance to make some big money if I would go up there. So I went up there. I played and I won. That was my first time up there.

Later I went back , and I lost everything I had won -- plus considerably more. And this is funny. After I lost all the money I had with me, I called my wife and told her to bring some money up to me. She did, and I lost all of that. Now I had flown up there to begin with, so when I called her next time, I told her to bring more money, but to drive because I needed transportation to get around.

In the meantime, I had borrowed some money, so when she got there, I paid off my debts and then proceeded to lose the rest. I played one game for my car and lost it (about 10 minutes). So Dear Momma brought more money. She did. I bought my car back, but I guess I don't have to tell you that I lost all that money too, plus the car again. So I said, "Good-bye Boys. I can no longer afford you," and I went home.


There aren't too many player who can laugh about a big loss like this. Does anybody remember his time in Detroit?

I saw Weenie Beenie play a local, Freddie Boggs, in Arlington, Virginia, $500 a game one pocket. It was after his prime, sometime in the mid to late '80s. It was like a cameo appearance having him in the pool room. We all drove over to check out the festivities. Weenie came there to play one pocket, but Freddie, a good one-hole player in his own right, took too long between shots, studying them, analyzing them, and Weenie Beenie pulled up after the first game. He just didn't like the pace of the game. :eek:

I saw him later in 2002 with Keith at the U.S. Open, and I sat down with him to chat. He was moving kind of slow, but he seemed content to be a railbird, sweating the U.S. Open matches. He was definitely one of the great ones.
A friend of mine, Chad Reno, has played Paul Brusloff several times. He asked Paul once, "What is the most you ever played for?" and he told him that he had played Weenie Beanie one game of one pocket for $325,000.00.
 

lll

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A friend of mine, Chad Reno, has played Paul Brusloff several times. He asked Paul once, "What is the most you ever played for?" and he told him that he had played Weenie Beanie one game of one pocket for $325,000.00.
:eek:...:eek:.....:eek:.....:eek:....


who won??:rolleyes:
 

wincardona

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Aug 7, 2007
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7,409
In perusing my pool print periodicals, magazines, newspapers, et cetera, from the '70s, '80s, and '90s, I get stuck every now and then when I come across a gem.

In the January 1984 issue of National Tavern News, there's an 8-page article written by Bill Pierce entitled "WEENIE BEENIE: A Classy Pool Player." I created a Wikipedia article about Bill Staton, and so I had to go through this pool print media piece just in case there was some good data to contribute to Wikipedia.

When asked "What was your best game?" Beenie replied, My best game was one pocket. I learned from a guy named FITZPATRICK. They called him "BUGS," and he was one of the greatest. He died in 1960, but I cut my teeth on guys like Earl Schriver, Rags, Eddie Taylor, and Squirrel. They were my teachers.

In my area, I grew up seeing the Weenie Beenie hot dog stands. In fact, there's still a few of them around in Northern Virginia, Arlington to be exact. Bill Staton was an all-around gambler, whether it was cards, golf, or pool. He owned the infamous pool room named Jack and Jill's in Arlington, Virginia, which was a road player's stop to get action. Oh, if those walls could talk!

What Weenie Beenie said about Detroit. :eek: I quit playing pool from 1972 to 1976. One day I received a call, and this guy told me they were playing pretty high in Detroit, and I had a chance to make some big money if I would go up there. So I went up there. I played and I won. That was my first time up there.

Later I went back , and I lost everything I had won -- plus considerably more. And this is funny. After I lost all the money I had with me, I called my wife and told her to bring some money up to me. She did, and I lost all of that. Now I had flown up there to begin with, so when I called her next time, I told her to bring more money, but to drive because I needed transportation to get around.

In the meantime, I had borrowed some money, so when she got there, I paid off my debts and then proceeded to lose the rest. I played one game for my car and lost it (about 10 minutes). So Dear Momma brought more money. She did. I bought my car back, but I guess I don't have to tell you that I lost all that money too, plus the car again. So I said, "Good-bye Boys. I can no longer afford you," and I went home.


There aren't too many player who can laugh about a big loss like this. Does anybody remember his time in Detroit?

I saw Weenie Beenie play a local, Freddie Boggs, in Arlington, Virginia, $500 a game one pocket. It was after his prime, sometime in the mid to late '80s. It was like a cameo appearance having him in the pool room. We all drove over to check out the festivities. Weenie came there to play one pocket, but Freddie, a good one-hole player in his own right, took too long between shots, studying them, analyzing them, and Weenie Beenie pulled up after the first game. He just didn't like the pace of the game. :eek:

I saw him later in 2002 with Keith at the U.S. Open, and I sat down with him to chat. He was moving kind of slow, but he seemed content to be a railbird, sweating the U.S. Open matches. He was definitely one of the great ones.
Yes Jennie, I remember that time well. I don't recall what year it was but The Beard probably does. Beenie lost just about all the money to a player from Chicago by the name of Kenny Romberg. There was a big money man from Detroit staking Romberg by the name of "Jones" The game they played was onepocket..even.. And at that time Beenie was regarded as a better onepocket player than Kenny, however, things don't always turn out as expected. As Beenie found out. Everyone was betting on Beenie.....the whole room....and Beenie just couldn't get there. Phil Hubbard a great hustler from Arlington VIrginia and a friend of Beenie was in with Beenie and convinced him to play me 9ball with a spot. He was telling Beenie that his accuracy was failing him, and by him playing me 9ball he could possibly sharpen his accuracy skills. He convinced Beenie to play me some cheap 9ball for $500 a game to sharpen his accuracy. $500 a game 9ball was very cheap in comparison to what they were betting playing Romberg onepocket. Beenie agreed and we started playing with me giving him the 8 and 9 playing 9ball. I was 20 games ahead ( $10,000) and Beenie asked me for the 7ball. Phil said to Beenie "why didn't you ask him 10 games ago, you could of gotten the adjustment then." I proceeded to beat Beenie another 10 games ahead for another $5,000 for a total of $15,000.

After that score I bought "Super Fly's". Lincoln Continental. My favorite car ever.:D

Beenie lost around $100,000 to Romberg. The rail also lost big ????? Who knows how much.

That was Beenies last trip to Det.

Dr. Bill
 

wincardona

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A friend of mine, Chad Reno, has played Paul Brusloff several times. He asked Paul once, "What is the most you ever played for?" and he told him that he had played Weenie Beanie one game of one pocket for $325,000.00.
Petie, never heard of that happening. If that would of happened the whole pool world would of been informed, and for sure I would of known.:sorry Detroit was real, the many stories told are real too. If there is anyone that has heard this story come forward and correct me, please. I was in Det. Every time Beenie was there. If this story is a fabrication ...like I feel it is....it only discredits all the legit stories of the huge action that Det. was known for. The most money that I personally witnessed lost in a single session was when Paul Brusloff played "Country" (greatest black hustler I have ever known) Paul lost over $250,000 in one session. I did hear that Jones wanted to play 1 game for $100,000 with Beenie. However, that never happened.

" Airplane Rosy" was the only man that I know that has lost that kind of money playing at "The Rack" in a single session. Many times.

Dr. Bill
 

fred bentivegna

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Originally Posted by JAM
In perusing my pool print periodicals, magazines, newspapers, et cetera, from the '70s, '80s, and '90s, I get stuck every now and then when I come across a gem.

In the January 1984 issue of National Tavern News, there's an 8-page article written by Bill Pierce entitled "WEENIE BEENIE: A Classy Pool Player." I created a Wikipedia article about Bill Staton, and so I had to go through this pool print media piece just in case there was some good data to contribute to Wikipedia.

When asked "What was your best game?" Beenie replied, My best game was one pocket. I learned from a guy named FITZPATRICK. They called him "BUGS," and he was one of the greatest. He died in 1960, but I cut my teeth on guys like Earl Schriver, Rags, Eddie Taylor, and Squirrel. They were my teachers.

In my area, I grew up seeing the Weenie Beenie hot dog stands. In fact, there's still a few of them around in Northern Virginia, Arlington to be exact. Bill Staton was an all-around gambler, whether it was cards, golf, or pool. He owned the infamous pool room named Jack and Jill's in Arlington, Virginia, which was a road player's stop to get action. Oh, if those walls could talk!

What Weenie Beenie said about Detroit. I quit playing pool from 1972 to 1976. One day I received a call, and this guy told me they were playing pretty high in Detroit, and I had a chance to make some big money if I would go up there. So I went up there. I played and I won. That was my first time up there.

Later I went back , and I lost everything I had won -- plus considerably more. And this is funny. After I lost all the money I had with me, I called my wife and told her to bring some money up to me. She did, and I lost all of that. Now I had flown up there to begin with, so when I called her next time, I told her to bring more money, but to drive because I needed transportation to get around.

In the meantime, I had borrowed some money, so when she got there, I paid off my debts and then proceeded to lose the rest. I played one game for my car and lost it (about 10 minutes). So Dear Momma brought more money. She did. I bought my car back, but I guess I don't have to tell you that I lost all that money too, plus the car again. So I said, "Good-bye Boys. I can no longer afford you," and I went home.

There aren't too many player who can laugh about a big loss like this. Does anybody remember his time in Detroit?

I saw Weenie Beenie play a local, Freddie Boggs, in Arlington, Virginia, $500 a game one pocket. It was after his prime, sometime in the mid to late '80s. It was like a cameo appearance having him in the pool room. We all drove over to check out the festivities. Weenie came there to play one pocket, but Freddie, a good one-hole player in his own right, took too long between shots, studying them, analyzing them, and Weenie Beenie pulled up after the first game. He just didn't like the pace of the game.

I saw him later in 2002 with Keith at the U.S. Open, and I sat down with him to chat. He was moving kind of slow, but he seemed content to be a railbird, sweating the U.S. Open matches. He was definitely one of the great ones.
Yes Jennie, I remember that time well. I don't recall what year it was but The Beard probably does. Beenie lost just about all the money to a player from Chicago by the name of Kenny Romberg. There was a big money man from Detroit staking Romberg by the name of "Jones" The game they played was onepocket..even.. And at that time Beenie was regarded as a better onepocket player than Kenny, however, things don't always turn out as expected. As Beenie found out. Everyone was betting on Beenie.....the whole room....and Beenie just couldn't get there. Phil Hubbard a great hustler from Arlington VIrginia and a friend of Beenie was in with Beenie and convinced him to play me 9ball with a spot. He was telling Beenie that his accuracy was failing him, and by him playing me 9ball he could possibly sharpen his accuracy skills. He convinced Beenie to play me some cheap 9ball for $500 a game to sharpen his accuracy. $500 a game 9ball was very cheap in comparison to what they were betting playing Romberg onepocket. Beenie agreed and we started playing with me giving him the 8 and 9 playing 9ball. I was 20 games ahead ( $10,000) and Beenie asked me for the 7ball. Phil said to Beenie "why didn't you ask him 10 games ago, you could of gotten the adjustment then." I proceeded to beat Beenie another 10 games ahead for another $5,000 for a total of $15,000.

After that score I bought "Super Fly's". Lincoln Continental. My favorite car ever.:D

Beenie lost around $100,000 to Romberg. The rail also lost big ????? Who knows how much.

That was Beenies last trip to Det.

Dr. Bill
Excuse me, Bill and Jammy, but this whole exchange is going to find its way into the "Weenie Beanie" page in my book. Finders, keepers. Of course you will both get another by-line.

Beard

And no, I dont remember the year Romberg beat Beanie. I was there however. Romberg and I would play "cheap" $50 a game 3 cushion, One-pocket and Banks in the afternoons at the Rack between his games with Beanie. The $50 he was betting was his own so I had an easier time of it than Beanie.
 

NH Steve

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In my interview with Beenie (probably January 2005, when he came to the Derby for the HOF dinner), he talked about that loss to Romburg -- he never added up the loss to me, but he did say they were playing for $20,000 and he lost and lost and lost several sessions over several days -- it seems to add up to well over a hundred big ones.
 

Jimmy B

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This is very special, the work you are doing on the Wikki pages. I read Wade Cranes, Beanie's, and of course the upcoming Ronnie Allen page. I would love for you to list all the people whose page you have worked on one day, Jam.
 

SJDinPHX

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I dont remember the year Romberg beat Beanie. I was there however. Romberg and I would play "cheap" $50 a game 3 cushion, One-pocket and Banks in the afternoons at the Rack between his games with Beanie. The $50 he was betting was his own so I had an easier time of it than Beanie...
Which begs the question,...Is this how Romberg got on your "b**t l**t" ???...Just askin'...:p
 
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JAM

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Yes Jennie, I remember that time well. I don't recall what year it was but The Beard probably does. Beenie lost just about all the money to a player from Chicago by the name of Kenny Romberg. There was a big money man from Detroit staking Romberg by the name of "Jones" The game they played was onepocket..even.. And at that time Beenie was regarded as a better onepocket player than Kenny, however, things don't always turn out as expected. As Beenie found out. Everyone was betting on Beenie.....the whole room....and Beenie just couldn't get there. Phil Hubbard a great hustler from Arlington VIrginia and a friend of Beenie was in with Beenie and convinced him to play me 9ball with a spot. He was telling Beenie that his accuracy was failing him, and by him playing me 9ball he could possibly sharpen his accuracy skills. He convinced Beenie to play me some cheap 9ball for $500 a game to sharpen his accuracy. $500 a game 9ball was very cheap in comparison to what they were betting playing Romberg onepocket. Beenie agreed and we started playing with me giving him the 8 and 9 playing 9ball. I was 20 games ahead ( $10,000) and Beenie asked me for the 7ball. Phil said to Beenie "why didn't you ask him 10 games ago, you could of gotten the adjustment then." I proceeded to beat Beenie another 10 games ahead for another $5,000 for a total of $15,000.

After that score I bought "Super Fly's". Lincoln Continental. My favorite car ever.:D

Beenie lost around $100,000 to Romberg. The rail also lost big ????? Who knows how much.

That was Beenies last trip to Det.

Dr. Bill

Holy Cow, that was some gambling session. Poor Weenie Beenie. Actually, reading the interview, I was kind of feeling sorry for his wife. She must have been one strong woman. :p

Thanks for sharing that, Billy. I love these kinds of pool stories, and here you were in the thick of it. That was a nice score! :)

There were several top pool stops where players could bet high as the Georgia pine before Internet technology came to the fore: Detroit, Tampa Bay Baker's Pool Room, Jack and Jill's in Arlington, VA, Hard Times in California with Big Bertha table, and then there was Mobile. Many of these were only known via word of mouth, of course.

Pool grapevine says Mobile is experiencing a resurgence of action lately. ;)
 

JAM

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Excuse me, Bill and Jammy, but this whole exchange is going to find its way into the "Weenie Beanie" page in my book. Finders, keepers. Of course you will both get another by-line.

Beard

And no, I dont remember the year Romberg beat Beanie. I was there however. Romberg and I would play "cheap" $50 a game 3 cushion, One-pocket and Banks in the afternoons at the Rack between his games with Beanie. The $50 he was betting was his own so I had an easier time of it than Beanie.
Can't wait to read you latest book, Fred! Good stuff, I am sure, and will be a must-have in everybody's library of cool pool reading material. :)
 

JAM

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In my interview with Beenie (probably January 2005, when he came to the Derby for the HOF dinner), he talked about that loss to Romburg -- he never added up the loss to me, but he did say they were playing for $20,000 and he lost and lost and lost several sessions over several days -- it seems to add up to well over a hundred big ones.
At the Open in 2002, I asked him how much the most was he ever played for, and he said 35,000. At the time, I thought he meant how much he lost, but I guess, after hearing form those on site in Detroit, he meant 35,000 per game. :eek:

I used to have poker games at my house every week, several times a week in fact, and we all knew each other from the pool room. It was a great deal for me, as since it was at my house, I got free ante, meaning I got a peak at the cards dealt to me for free. ;)

Tom Wirth will remember those games. Eh, Tom? :D

Next to my poker table was my 9-foot Brunwick Century table. It wasn't a top-of-the-line Brunswick, but it wasn't a cheap one either. It cost about $1,900, if memory serves me.

One night as the poker game was coming to a close, one of our "regular" poker players, Hadji, who was a well-known high roller but played my speed in pool, asked me to play $100 a game. I was up in the poker game, so I thought what the heck. :)

I was not used to playing pool for $100 a game, which for me was high stakes. I couoldn't make a ball. I lost miserably and started playing him on the tab. I ended up owing him over a thousand. I will never forget how I felt when I was gambling that high. My face felt hot, my stomach was upset, and each time before I pulled the trigger to execute a shot, my mind talked myself out of it, saying, "If you miss, you will now owe him $900," et cetera.

Today I like high-stakes action, but only participating as a railbird. Keith, on the other hand, will bet it as high as he can go, even when he's not financially prepared to do so. He just forms a backers committee if he's on the shortskies. :lol
 

JAM

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This is very special, the work you are doing on the Wikki pages. I read Wade Cranes, Beanie's, and of course the upcoming Ronnie Allen page. I would love for you to list all the people whose page you have worked on one day, Jam.
Well, thank you very, very much, Jimmy B, for taking the time to check out those articles. Each one takes a long time to develop due to the Wikipedia rules, which I still have trouble understanding fully.

Once you create the article, then any Wiki editor can contribute to it. Here's the ones I started from scratch: Cisero Murphy, Buddy Hall, Jimmy Mataya, Larry Lisciotti, Keith McCready (of course :D), Allen Hopkins, Danny Basasvich, Cornbread Red, Lou Butera, Wade Crane, Kim Davenport, Danny DiLiberto, Pat Fleming, Buddy Hall, Grady Mathews, Rodney Morris, Reed Pierce, Jim Rempe, George SanSouci, Bill Staton, Shane Van Boening, Ronnie Allen, Dallas West, and there's probably a couple more that I can't remember at first glance.

Some of the articles are just kind of like bare bones or placeholders at this time. I haven't had a chance to develop them more, but when I do put my mind to expanding an article, I give it all I can. Wade Crane and Cisero Murphy's articles were developed fully within a couple days, as an example.

I have contributed, however, to most of the players on the list of 70 American Pool Players at the time of this writing, especially Jean Balukas, Willie Mosconi, Jimmy Wetch, Minnesota Fats, and a few more. When I am working on one article perusing my pool mags/newspapers and see something noteworthy, I stop and add it to the player's article. Other Wiki editors do the same. We always contribute to each other's articles. My main interest in Wikipedia is, of course, American pool players, but I have contributed to European and Filipino pool payers as well. The photos you see for Bustie and Alex in their Wiki articles are mine, and I also added a little content to their articles. ;)

What's difficult with Wikipedia is that you can write anything on there, but if you have no proof, they will remove the words written. It's frustrating as heck.
 

JAM

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:D
...After that score I bought "Super Fly's". Lincoln Continental. My favorite car ever.:D...
Everybody has one. That, in fact, is my older brother's favorite car too. Mine was a Chrysler 5th Avenue, which was 7-ball red with buttoned leather seats. :p

For those who may not know what a Lincoln looks like back in this era, just imagine Billy riding around in this car, depicted below, listening to ---> SUPER FLY![ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cmo6MRYf5g"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cmo6MRYf5g[/ame]
 

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tonygreen

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At the Open in 2002, I asked him how much the most was he ever played for, and he said 35,000. At the time, I thought he meant how much he lost, but I guess, after hearing form those on site in Detroit, he meant 35,000 per game. :eek:

I used to have poker games at my house every week, several times a week in fact, and we all knew each other from the pool room. It was a great deal for me, as since it was at my house, I got free ante, meaning I got a peak at the cards dealt to me for free. ;)

Tom Wirth will remember those games. Eh, Tom? :D

Next to my poker table was my 9-foot Brunwick Century table. It wasn't a top-of-the-line Brunswick, but it wasn't a cheap one either. It cost about $1,900, if memory serves me.

One night as the poker game was coming to a close, one of our "regular" poker players, Hadji, who was a well-known high roller but played my speed in pool, asked me to play $100 a game. I was up in the poker game, so I thought what the heck. :)

I was not used to playing pool for $100 a game, which for me was high stakes. I couoldn't make a ball. I lost miserably and started playing him on the tab. I ended up owing him over a thousand. I will never forget how I felt when I was gambling that high. My face felt hot, my stomach was upset, and each time before I pulled the trigger to execute a shot, my mind talked myself out of it, saying, "If you miss, you will now owe him $900," et cetera.

Today I like high-stakes action, but only participating as a railbird. Keith, on the other hand, will bet it as high as he can go, even when he's not financially prepared to do so. He just forms a backers committee if he's on the shortskies. :lol
What 10 years or so were Weenie's best years ? Strawberry gave him 3 balls in Weenie's house in the 80's (double check for verification on Accu-Stats dvd from Mathews and Ervolino commentary Brooks vs Joyner '94)

Great players have games that will "fall off" without them realising it. As on Beard's list, put them on a "gaff" table and see what happens. And, sometimes they may surprise you and come back for more ... yes or no Beard?
 

JAM

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What 10 years or so were Weenie's best years ? Strawberry gave him 3 balls in Weenie's house in the 80's (double check for verification on Accu-Stats dvd from Mathews and Ervolino commentary Brooks vs Joyner '94)

Great players have games that will "fall off" without them realising it. As on Beard's list, put them on a "gaff" table and see what happens. And, sometimes they may surprise you and come back for more ... yes or no Beard?
Weenie's best era was in the '60s or early '70s. Strawberry in his prime came after Weenie Beenie in his prime. According to the records, Weenie Beenie started playing pool at the age of 22, and he was born in 1928. I'd imagine when he owned Jack and Jill's in Arlington, he was in his prime, and that was definitely in the '60s. I ventured into that pool room with my girlfriend one time as a teenager, walked down those steps. Being the only girls in there, we got nervous and ran back out as quick as we walked in. :eek:

Strawberry's prime was in the '80s. I remember the first time I ever saw Strawberry play, he snuck in Champion's in Silver Spring, MD. I was working graveyard shift, and in comes this player, alone, who started hitting balls pretty sporty. All eyeballs in the place were fixated on his table. You kind of know when a player comes in the room looking for action. They let their sticks do the talking.

Finally, he was approached by several "regulars" who didn't know who he was. He had just gotten out of his, uh, shall we say, state-imposed retirement, and he was fresh as a daisy. The facility where he was at had a pool table, and he claims that he'd hit balls every day to pass the time away. So when it got out, he was most definitely in stroke. ;)

Did you know Strawberry had a cameo appearance in the HBO series called "Wired"? He played a drug dealer in the TV show, which was filmed in Baltimore.
 

fred bentivegna

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Feb 2, 2005
Messages
6,690
What 10 years or so were Weenie's best years ? Strawberry gave him 3 balls in Weenie's house in the 80's (double check for verification on Accu-Stats dvd from Mathews and Ervolino commentary Brooks vs Joyner '94)

Great players have games that will "fall off" without them realising it. As on Beard's list, put them on a "gaff" table and see what happens. And, sometimes they may surprise you and come back for more ... yes or no Beard?
I am not sure what you are asking Tony. I do know that players have days when their game drops off unbelievably sometimes. I busted Grady playing even (at home), six months later he ended up giving me 11 to 7 in Milwaukee. Three months later in my own room he quit after losing only 3 games with him only giving me 9 to 8 on his break. Most players havent had the kind of ups and downs that I have had, but it does eventually happen to everybody. Bugs ended up giving Jersey Red 9 to 7 playing on a very bad table in Skokie, IL.

In the "old" days, tough hustlers would keep raising the spot as long as they kept on winning - until they finally broke you. The next time they played however, those "bad" games were taken off the table, and the spots went back to reasonable proportions.

Beard

And speaking of Strawberry, late 80s or early 90s, I beat Strawberry out of 10,000 playing even Onepocket in Bob Agins all-black poolroom on Chicago's South Side. Months later, in my own joint he came back and wanted to play some more. I knew I wasnt the same player I was six months earlier so I asked for a ball, hoping he would be insulted and say no. Instead he agreed and I had to play, and I of course lost. ( He didnt get anywhere near even from the 10k however. As I said, I knew I was out of sorts)
 

petie

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Oct 2, 2005
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Petie, never heard of that happening. If that would of happened the whole pool world would of been informed, and for sure I would of known.:sorry Detroit was real, the many stories told are real too. If there is anyone that has heard this story come forward and correct me, please. I was in Det. Every time Beenie was there. If this story is a fabrication ...like I feel it is....it only discredits all the legit stories of the huge action that Det. was known for. The most money that I personally witnessed lost in a single session was when Paul Brusloff played "Country" (greatest black hustler I have ever known) Paul lost over $250,000 in one session. I did hear that Jones wanted to play 1 game for $100,000 with Beenie. However, that never happened.

" Airplane Rosy" was the only man that I know that has lost that kind of money playing at "The Rack" in a single session. Many times.

Dr. Bill
Perhaps Rosie was the inspiration or genesis of the tale that made it's way to me via Chad. I am so gullible. I take everyone at face value. Thanks for fact checking my stories. They are much more interesting that way.
 

Alfie Taylor

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Jan 21, 2010
Messages
189
I have to add...

I have to add...

Bill "Weenie Beanie" Staton and I became best friends in his later years. Along with our wives, we traveled to the Yucatan, Greece and Turkey, Japan and other places together. We found casinos in every country and I watched him catch a blackjack dealer on the cruise ship cheating. He told me a lot of his pool stories but the figures didn't jump so high. Who knows? Maybe he forgot or didn't want to tell me, but I doubt it.
What I have to add to this pool lore was he was the nicest gentleman I ever knew. All of his family are my close friends and they all adored him. I miss my pal every day.
Keep it respectful. Alfie
 

wincardona

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Aug 7, 2007
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7,409
Bill "Weenie Beanie" Staton and I became best friends in his later years. Along with our wives, we traveled to the Yucatan, Greece and Turkey, Japan and other places together. We found casinos in every country and I watched him catch a blackjack dealer on the cruise ship cheating. He told me a lot of his pool stories but the figures didn't jump so high. Who knows? Maybe he forgot or didn't want to tell me, but I doubt it.
What I have to add to this pool lore was he was the nicest gentleman I ever knew. All of his family are my close friends and they all adored him. I miss my pal every day.
Keep it respectful. Alfie
I played a lot of pool with Beanie and cards as well. He was actually a pretty good guy who loved action, and yes he tried to get the best of it because he was a smart gambler with a lot of pride. I have always respected Beanie and considered him a good friend.Do I think Beanie was a class act? Yes I do.

Dr. Bill
 
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