vernon elliott bank

lll

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a saturday morning shot to try :D
[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5tbr4N0P_w&list=PL0EDB4BFCE6C8E3DC[/ame]
 

Big Jim

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banks

banks

I played Vernon for the cash/low/stakes, back in the 80's, when he began making some really unusual banks i knew it was him, no one wanted to kill his action by giving me his name. We played at Parkmoor in Louisville for 4 hours 30 bucks a rack, broke even, was glad to have done that well playing Vernon.
 

cuesmith

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I played Vernon for the cash/low/stakes, back in the 80's, when he began making some really unusual banks i knew it was him, no one wanted to kill his action by giving me his name. We played at Parkmoor in Louisville for 4 hours 30 bucks a rack, broke even, was glad to have done that well playing Vernon.
Yeah, you had a tiger by the tail, fo sho!
 

gulfportdoc

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I wonder if it's required to have a FAULTY stroke to produce this shot, as Bob Jewett has by following thru across the cue ball crooked, instead of using a , "straight thru" stroke! Bill Smith "Mr3Cushion"
Heh, heh. I think Bob was using Back Hand English (BHE), or some form of it. He's always been a good player with sound mechanics, who has been a certified pool instructor for many years. But the stroke he utilized for this particular shot does give the appearance of amateurism.;)

Doc
 

mr3cushion

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Heh, heh. I think Bob was using Back Hand English (BHE), or some form of it. He's always been a good player with sound mechanics, who has been a certified pool instructor for many years. But the stroke he utilized for this particular shot does give the appearance of amateurism.;)

Doc
Doc; The video speaks for it's self!

Bill Smith "Mr3Cushion"
 

NH Steve

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vernon elliott bank

Think maybe its because he is pinching the cue ball between his tip and the rail to maximize his English?
 

Cowboy Dennis

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Maybe, just maybe, the player shooting the shot knows how to pocket the ball and what needs to be done to do just that. Strange idea I know.
 

boingo

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Worth a try.

Worth a try.

That was a great shot faulty stroke or not, I'm going to give it a try tomorrow.
 

Cary

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Some of the old, old-timers used to teach that stroke for certain shots (along with another one involving a twist of the wrist). Billy Sunday was one. I remember using both in my first life when I could still make a ball now and then. Just wish I could remember how, why, and when.
 

fred bentivegna

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Some of the old, old-timers used to teach that stroke for certain shots (along with another one involving a twist of the wrist). Billy Sunday was one. I remember using both in my first life when I could still make a ball now and then. Just wish I could remember how, why, and when.
Eddie Taylor, Piggy Banks, Truman, and myself, use a wrist-twist on certain shots. Shooting to one side, you twist it inside, shooting to the other side, you twist it outside.

Beard

Anybody want more, ask Clever Lou.
 

usblues

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I hear ya about....

I hear ya about....

....the how,why and when....like the shot where you squeeze the cue tight to make a radical cut shot go in....cheers,James
 

John Brumback

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I don't think you can make this type of shot without putting some kind of swipe stroke on the cball.

I asked Buddy Hall one time about doing that to the cball and he called it "tuck and roll" I never did understand that description though:frus:lol

Heck of a shot no matter how he did it. JB
 

tylerdurden

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I have never thought of strokes to be "faulty" in the way mentioned here. I noticed over the years, on certain shots, especially ones where the ob is very close to the hole, good players use strange strokes to get some extra torque on the ball. I never put too much thought into it myself. If you need to pocket a long, difficult shot or something like that, this is another story... I think you have got to be going straight. You can spin balls in beyond 90 degrees too, you aint going to do it with a straight stroke though. It is just a stroke that makes the impossible, possible. It isn't faulty.

In short, if you are getting it done under pressure, there is no "faulty", only effective.
 

androd

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BHE is a very useful tool playing pool. I use it often on thin cuts, opening and closing banks and making the CB go to different places. Some people snicker at first, then begin asking how to do it. :)
Rod.
P.S. These shots get much harder a half table away. Mr. Jewett makes a hell of a hit in this example.
 

mr3cushion

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Androd; This is the kind of back hand info that can cause players to,"Dog it" when trying to execute a stroke that is NOT normal, and that's NOT used constantly!

I have demonstrated to many pool players, (some whom are actually members of this forum) in person over the years how to cut the ball thinner than an Italian butcher slicing, "Prosciutto di Parma", and to apply spin to the cue ball as well as TW puts backspin on a golf ball, by going, "STRAIGHT THRU" vertically and horizontally with cue thru the cue ball. This is where the use of, "different strokes" comes into play in the Carom games!

Bill Smith "Mr3Cushion"
 

Jimmy B

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Watch him go down three balls below the side and still make it


[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql-vXWEA_TU[/ame]
 

mr3cushion

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Maybe a few pages from my first book/DVD, "The Concise Book of Position Play", will help clarify the techniques used in the, "Modern Game" of 3 Cushion around the World!

Also, some of the more astute learned members on the forum will be able to apply these techniques to billiards/pool as I have, for almost 50 years.

The Stroke and Follow Through

The past and present strokes in 3 Cushion Billiards

One of the most common faults of amateur players is the incorrect concept of the proper stroke and follow-through in 3 cushion billiards. Unfortunately years ago in the pre-modern game era, 30’s 40’ and 50’s, the equipment in the United States was vastly different. Modern tables are heated. Synthetic rubber is used for the cushions. Phenolic balls are used instead of Ivory and the woolen table cloth slowed the cue ball down more than today's cloth. The statement, “you must follow-through on all shots”, was misleading. The professionals of that era should have said, “Apply the proper follow-through for each individual shot”.

The modern game of 3 cushion billiards has evolved into a precision game. In order to achieve that consistent precision, you must have a stroke that is free from flaws. A certain amount of natural hand-eye coordination will give some player’s more consistent results. But the proper stroke and follow through can be taught to the level of any player’s natural ability.

The start of the proper stroke
The proper stroke starts in the pre-setup routine. After analyzing the position that waits for you, determine what kind of stroke is needed to achieve a point. Before the player addresses the cue ball, he needs to decide on the rhythm and tempo for that particular shot. Use a couple of warm up strokes to get the feeling.

When addressing the cue ball, the cue tip should be fairly close to the cue ball before you start your backswing. The player should learn to develop the same number of warm-up strokes on every shot. This provides the rhythm component of the stroke.

I personally believe in the continuous straight, horizontal and vertical stroke method, and not pausing. If the player interrupts the rhythm, he may lose the timing and tempo he was trying to achieve. Another very important part of the stroke is crescendo, (increasing speed), never decelerating. Just remember, whatever number of warm-up strokes you choose to take, embed that into your game.

The five basic strokes to simpler billiards
It’s time to talk about the real basis for being able to play better and get better position with less effort. There are five basic strokes used in 3 cushion billiards. They are the: normal, short, rapid, slow, and dead ball strokes. These and their combinations are used to avoid kisses and play position. Knowing when and how to use these strokes is the core to being a better than average player. When the player knows the correct strokes to use for certain shots, they need not be concerned on contacting the first object ball exactly, that’s the one thing that makes 3 cushion billiards more forgiving than pocket billiards.

The normal stroke
Now to the different strokes, the normal stroke can be defined as a stroke that has a follow through approximately twice the length of the bridge the player is using for that specific shot. This stroke is used for most shots that have a natural angle from the cue ball to the object ball and then to the first cushion. We can generally use the normal stroke for natural angle cushion first shots (banks).

View attachment 8295

The short stroke
The next stroke is the short stroke. The name explains it all. The short stroke is probably used by better players more often than any other, especially on new cloth. This stroke is not an abrupt jab, but a well timed shortened stroke with a shorter follow through than the length of the player’s bridge.

View attachment 8296

A little trick to help facilitate the effect is to use a shorter bridge than normal. Keeping the cue tip on the cue ball for a shortened time gives a purer hit. This makes sense. The common use of the short stroke is to make extremely thin hits on the object ball, keeping the cue ball from rolling forward on perpendicular angles into the first ball. Less wrist action helps with these types of shots.

The rapid stroke
The rapid stroke is used for giving pace to the cue ball without really hitting the cue ball hard. It’s like a discus thrower winding up before he releases. It will give momentum to the shot. The rapid stroke simply means that the warm-up and delivery-strokes are moving faster than the normal stoke. This stroke is employed on five, six, and seven cushion shots, especially with full hits on the first object ball, to avoid a kiss, or drive that ball a lengthy distance.

The slow stroke
Using the slow stroke will allow the player greater accuracy when playing half-table, short-angle shots, where the first ball is hit less than half full. Another application of the slow stroke is to help impart extreme English to the cue ball. During the delivery strokes the cue will swing slower than the normal stroke. This will help facilitate an exaggerated follow-through at impact, combined with more impetus. This results in a high rate of spin on the cue ball, thus making it possible to maintain English on 3, 4, or even 5 cushions.

The dead-ball stroke
And finally, the last basic stroke is called the dead-ball stroke. This stroke is very useful when playing steep angle across the table shots and full length table short-angle shots. The dead ball stroke is really a combination of the short stroke, grip and the technique used for this stroke.

The technique for this stroke uses no wrist action and only the forearm moves from the elbow. There is no wrist-break with the dead-ball stroke. Don't open and close the hand around the cue. This gives less rotation to the cue, so less effect. With this technique, using the short stroke with no wrist action, the player is able to control the natural forward motion of the cue ball on very full hits. The long table full ball shots do not need much force. Thus, the player will have better control.

Bill Smith "Mr3Cushion"
 
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gulfportdoc

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Watch him go down three balls below the side and still make it.
It's hard to see where the shooter is cueing the CB, but it looks to me like he's either using straight low, or even inside. Anyone know?

Doc
 
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