The Top Ten One-Pocket Players That You Meet In Heaven

Cowboy Dennis

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I think it is time for this thread to be resurrected. I have not picked a 10th player for my list yet and just can't seem to limit myself to one of the few choices I'd make. Oh well, good thread anyway.

I'd sure like to see other's picks.

Dennis
 

bstroud

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Boy is this thread making me feel old.

I have known and played with almost all the players on the list.

1. Fatty was the most fun and played better than most give him credit for.

2. Jersey Red was a $20 bettor but was a great player and was willing to share all that he knew with other players. I learned a lot playing with him.

3. Lingo I only saw play once. Never had the nerve to play him. I was 17.

4. Camp was a great player and would bet what he had. I played him pay ball at the truck stop in Macon, GA when I was on the road with Taylor.

5. Eddie Taylor. He was just the best.

6. Cokes was bigger than life. I played him at the Elks club in Evansville. Fatty and Blackie were watching. Won enough for a new gold Rolex.

7. Rags I never even saw but Taylor often told me he was the best. Pretty high praise.

8. Schriver I never played but I beat him out of $1100. when he staked Allen Keil against me.

9. Peter Rabbit was more fun in the pool room than anyone except Fatty. Always in action.

10. Bugs. I loaned him my cue when he was at the Dayton tournament that Joe Burns and I put on. The cue came back with chalk all over the wrap because he held the chalk in the same hand.

11. Worst had the best stroke I ever saw. Marvin Henderson was next.

12. Babyface I only saw at Johnson city. I seem to remember he always had a lady with him.

There are lots more. I just ran out of time. Hopefully finishing my pool room today.

Bill S.
 

SJDinPHX

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Boy is this thread making me feel old.

I have known and played with almost all the players on the list.

Jersey Red was a $20 bettor but was a great player and was willing to share all that he knew with other players. I learned a lot playing with him.

Bill S.
Bill, I take exception to your description of Red !...He was never a hi-roller, but if he had a decent game, he has been known to take 'the rubber band' off !...I partnered with him several times !..He also had a lot of heart when getting staked at hi-$$$ pool !
 

wincardona

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Good that you knew Marcel Camp too. Camp is long dead, but he was an all-time great. He knew Onepocket as good as anybody alive. A great character and a great money player. He bet his own money and always carried his total bankroll on his person. If he had 20k, it would be in one big lump in his pocket. When he got lucky at the track, he might have from 10k to 25k in his pocket.
At the Congress Bowl in Miami, where he finished his career, Camp had gotten old and plump, and Fats would call him Ma Barker because of his resemblance to the 30s female desperado. He had 1 suit and 1 pair of shoes and I'm guessing 2 shirts and 2 pair of socks.
He, unlike Fats, was not a very snappy dresser. He wore a suit all the time, but it was made by Dunlap. "Done all it could, but now its lapping over." You could clock his bankroll by his dress habits. A new shirt meant 5k. New shoes was 10k plus.
He could also eat Fats' speed. Camp got gotten himself barred from every pitch-till-you-win, all-you-can-eat joint in South Florida. Once him and Fat Wes (450lbs) walked into one of those buffet joints and didn't get past the front door. The owner told Camp, "You've got to be kidding." Bottom line, is he deserves HOF, but it probably won't ever happen. That's why I was so insistent about Fats, because his peers, Gene Skinner and Camp have little chance of making it.


Beard
Excellent post Fred, you described Camp to a tee. I played Camp 9ball, we never played one pocket. Story below.

I was 18 years old and on the road living in Florida, Miami to be exact. I met a pool player by the name of "kilroy" what a character this guy was, talk about a guy who always smiled..well Kilroy was that guy. Kilroy played a decent speed i'd say around John Henderson's speed, however, playing wasn't his forte he was a "steer man" and a damn good one. Like I said I was around 18 years old and was hanging in the Congress Bowl, every one knows about the Congress. I had beaten Kilroy a few games of 9ball and he quit quickly and preceded to do what he did best...steer. He said there was this guy who was a sucker who played at another pool room that he wanted me to play, he said that when I beat this guy he'll lose everything he has in his pocket and then he'll start to borrow money from the owner who will give him 100's of dollors. It was raining that night and we had to drive about 20 miles to get to this pool room and Kilroy asked me to follow him. I'll never forget this night, Kilroy had this old Ford with the front drivers side window missing and he had a piece of card board from a box in place of the window..and it was raining like ...really hard. Monsoon type rain. I'll never forget it. WE were on the freeway and Kilroy was "struggling" to keep the cardboard in place to keep the rain from pouring through the missing window, he wasn't winning the battle.:eek::lol Like I mentioned the pool room was about 20 miles from the Congress and by the time we got there Kilroy was "soaking wet" But he still had this cigar in his mouth. If you know Kilroy he always smoked a cigar, and he always had this smile on his face like he was stealing something ..that kind of a smile.

Well we finally arrived at the pool room and we went inside, that's when I saw this big fat guy who wore a suit..just like Fred said, however, this suit was an old suit that looked like it needed ironed. Kilroy introduced me to this big fella and told him that this kid (meaning me) wanted to play some 5 dollor- 9ball. WE shook hands and immediately went to the table to play. Well I played really good 9ball at the age of 18 and started to run out..like every rack. I beat Camp for $45 before he quit, and he owed me for the last game. Camp played really good but that night he didn't play so well, I guess he was on short money and was embarrased for a young guy my age to have beaten him. He kept complaining after he missed (which was often) he was a "whiner" not a winner..a whiner.But it was hilarious watching Kilroy as I was running out as he 'chewed on his cigar and continued to keep that smile on his face.

After I beat Camp and before I went to my car Kilroy asked me for his end, I gave him $15 and said thanks for the steer. The next day I went back into the Congress and who do you think was playing one pocket? You got it..Marcel Camp..the big fella I had beaten the night before and Kilroy was right there watching him play with that cigar in his mouth and that smile on his face.

Dr. Bill
 
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wincardona

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Good that you knew Marcel Camp too. Camp is long dead, but he was an all-time great. He knew Onepocket as good as anybody alive. A great character and a great money player. He bet his own money and always carried his total bankroll on his person. If he had 20k, it would be in one big lump in his pocket. When he got lucky at the track, he might have from 10k to 25k in his pocket.
At the Congress Bowl in Miami, where he finished his career, Camp had gotten old and plump, and Fats would call him Ma Barker because of his resemblance to the 30s female desperado. He had 1 suit and 1 pair of shoes and I'm guessing 2 shirts and 2 pair of socks.
He, unlike Fats, was not a very snappy dresser. He wore a suit all the time, but it was made by Dunlap. "Done all it could, but now its lapping over." You could clock his bankroll by his dress habits. A new shirt meant 5k. New shoes was 10k plus.
He could also eat Fats' speed. Camp got gotten himself barred from every pitch-till-you-win, all-you-can-eat joint in South Florida. Once him and Fat Wes (450lbs) walked into one of those buffet joints and didn't get past the front door. The owner told Camp, "You've got to be kidding." Bottom line, is he deserves HOF, but it probably won't ever happen. That's why I was so insistent about Fats, because his peers, Gene Skinner and Camp have little chance of making it.


Beard
Excellent post Fred, you described Camp to a tee. I played Camp 9ball, we never played one pocket. Story below.

I was 18 years old and on the road living in Florida, Miami to be exact. I met a pool player by the name of "kilroy" what a character this guy was, talk about a guy who always smiled..well Kilroy was that guy. Kilroy played a decent speed i'd say around John Henderson's speed, however, playing wasn't his forte he was a "steer man" and a damn good one. Like I said I was around 18 years old and was hanging in the Congress Bowl, every one knows about the Congress. I had beaten Kilroy a few games of 9ball and he quit quickly and preceded to do what he did best...steer. He said there was this guy who was a sucker who played at another pool room that he wanted me to play, he said that when I beat this guy he'll lose everything he has in his pocket and then he'll start to borrow money from the owner who will give him 100's of dollors. It was raining that night and we had to drive about 20 miles to get to this pool room and Kilroy asked me to follow him. I'll never forget this night, Kilroy had this old Ford with the front drivers side window missing and he had a piece of card board from a box in place of the window..and it was raining like ...really hard. Monsoon type rain. I'll never forget it. WE were on the freeway and Kilroy was "struggling" to keep the cardboard in place to keep the rain from pouring through the missing window, he he wasn't winning the battle.:eek::lol Like I mentioned the pool room was about 20 miles from the Congress and by the time we got there Kilroy was "soaking wet" But he still had this cigar in his mouth. If you know Kilroy he always smoked a cigar, and he always had this smile on his face like he was stealing something ..that kind of a smile.

Well we finally arrived at the pool room and we went inside, that's when I saw this big fat guy who wore a suit..just like Fred said, however, this suit was an old suit that looked like it needed ironed. Kilroy introduced me to this big fella and told him that this kid (meaning me) wanted to play some 5 dollor- 9ball. WE shook hands and immediately went to the table to play. Well I played really good 9ball at the age of 18 and started to run out..like every rack. I beat Camp for $45 before he quit, and he owed me for the last game. Camp played really good but that night he didn't play so well, I guess he was on short money and was embarrased for a young guy my age to have beaten him. He kept complaining after he missed (which was often) he was a "whiner" not a winner..a whiner.But it was hilarious watching Kilroy as I was running out as he 'chewed on his cigar and continued to keep that smile on his face.

After I beat Camp and before I went to my car Kilroy asked me for his end, I gave him $15 and said thanks for the steer. The next day I went back into the Congress and who do you think was playing one pocket? You got it..Marcel Camp..the big fella I had beaten the night before and Kilroy was right there watching him play with that cigar in his mouth and that smile on his face.

Dr. Bill
 

bstroud

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Bill, I take exception to your description of Red !...He was never a hi-roller, but if he had a decent game, he has been known to take 'the rubber band' off !...I partnered with him several times !..He also had a lot of heart when getting staked at hi-$$$ pool !
Dick,

I agree. Red just didn't bet his own. When he got staked he played very well and would play high.

Bill S.
 

androd

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I don't know how interesting it'd be to talk to him.
He never had much to say, but Steve Cook was an excellent one pocket player.
As was Johnny Vevis, I play Cook in his prime and Vevis when he was over the hill.
Rod.
P.S. Vevis was a wild man and very interesting.
 

SJDinPHX

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I don't know how interesting it'd be to talk to him.
He never had much to say, but Steve Cook was an excellent one pocket player.
As was Johnny Vevis, I play Cook in his prime and Vevis when he was over the hill.
Rod.
P.S. Vevis was a wild man and very interesting.
Yes, he was the 'original' wild man..and usually chemically enhanced too ! ;)...Let me tell my favorite Vevis story..He came through San Jose, shortly after he won the first Johnston City tournament !..He gave me considerable weight playing one pocket, and just destroyed me !...A few years later, we played again in Cochran's... My one pocket game had improved a lot by then, and He tried to give me 10/8, then 9/8 !..Things were not going to well for him that session...Then a real funny thing occurred !

Vevis was lining up a fairly easy shot, to win a pivotal game..He missed it a mile, and sold out !..Now Cochran's was a huge room, but It seems there was an old man reading a paper, on the other side of the room, about 120 ft. away...I guess he was in Vevis' line of sight, and apparently just as he was shooting, the old man turned the page !...Vevis slammed his stick to the floor, stormed across the room, snatched the old man's paper, wadded it up and stomped it on the floor for a few minutes !..He then threw the startled old guy a $1, and told him to "get another f**king paper, and read it some other f**king place" ! :eek:

I think Vevis may have killed anyone who laughed at him over that situation...I know I didn't ! :cool: (but I promptly excused my self to go to the john)..I believe I lost the next game, due to tears in my eyes !:D
 
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gulfportdoc

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I don't know how interesting it'd be to talk to him.
He never had much to say, but Steve Cook was an excellent one pocket player.
As was Johnny Vevis, I play Cook in his prime and Vevis when he was over the hill.
Rod.
P.S. Vevis was a wild man and very interesting.
Rod, was it Vevis who used heroin? Or was it booze? I heard he was one of the best until the newer crop of players came along.

~Doc
 

piggybank04

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cornbread red,grady,tommy parker from cleveland,don willis,clem,eddie taylor,bugs(really wanted to meet him), jersey red......i dont think tommy parker or don willis played one pocket much but i would still like to meet them ......i met cornbread at dcc and grady and i met eddie taylor there......steve cook for sure.....
 

androd

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Rod, was it Vevis who used heroin? Or was it booze? I heard he was one of the best until the newer crop of players came along.

~Doc
Heroin, I took him to his room once and there were needles everywhere.
He said "Ah, don't worry about that I've been taking some B12 shots." :D
Rod.
P.S. I couldn't wait to get outta there. :eek:
P.P.S. His life's ambition was to kill a sweater.
 
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TWO PICKS

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Probably my late friend Frank Bananas Rodriguez is not up there. If he was I would ask him when he was playing me and Freddie the Bear and had ANDROD for a partner. Why would he not shoot at his hole?
 

SJDinPHX

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Heroin, I took him to his room once and there were needles everywhere.
He said "Ah, don't worry about that I've been taking some B12 shots." :D
Rod.
P.S. I couldn't wait to get outta there. :eek:
P.P.S. His life's ambition was to kill a sweater.
True statement Rod, I'm sure if he hadn't flamed out early, he would have accomplished that goal..:eek:
 

Island Drive

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I was in college, but Rempe @ Johnson City seemed to play pretty well, RA and of course Fatty and Artie. Did Jimmy Marino play one hole?
 
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Cowboy Dennis

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I think it is time for this thread to be resurrected. I have not picked a 10th player for my list yet and just can't seem to limit myself to one of the few choices I'd make. Oh well, good thread anyway.

I'd sure like to see other's picks.

Dennis
After giving it much due diligence I must select Fred Bentivegna as my #10. I never met Freddy but we had a couple of phone calls and a very intimate e-mail relationship (away from prying eyes) the last couple years of his life.

He had a giant ego that sustained him and enough knowledge about the game to entertain all of us. He had a certain wit & presence that many of us respected and liked.

Freddy was/is great for pool and always will be. They will be talking about him when they have forgotten about others from Chicago.

Dennis
 

Cowboy Dennis

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After thinking about who would be #9 for the last ten months I decided to go with Alton "Babyface" Whitlow. He was past his prime in the early to mid-80's (when I first met him) just as I was beginning to feel confident at the table. One of my greatest regrets in pool is not playing him when he asked me to. He wanted to play even one-pocket for $10 a game and I held out for 10-8. I just didn't feel like donating my hard-earned cash to a "player", I didn't know or realize the extent of his playing abilities, I figured he was a very good player (or had been) and I wasn't and that was worthy of 10-8. I was probably right but I wish I had played him anyway, it's not like I never donated to players before that. I was 22-25 yrs. old and I don't know his age at the time. He would have a bottle in the inside pocket of his jacket and he'd be hittin' it regular while he was in the room. I don't think I've ever heard a bad word said about him and I wouldn't care if I did.

If he had realized that I was a young, scared, up & coming semi-shortstop then he would have given me 10-8 knowing that if I robbed him I would adjust until I lost it back with more added, as was my habit. If I had realized that he was a past-his-prime tippler who didn't have much cash I would have played him even for the $10 per game. He should have had better steerers, then we would have played, as it is I'll have to wait.

1. Minnesota Fats

2. Jack Breit

3. Harold Worst

4. Bugs

5. Ralph Greenleaf

6. Marcel Camp

7. Eddie Taylor

8. Hubert Cokes

9. Alton "Babyface" Whitlow

10. Freddy "The Beard" Bentivegna.
After giving it much due diligence I must select Fred Bentivegna as my #10. I never met Freddy but we had a couple of phone calls and a very intimate e-mail relationship (away from prying eyes) the last couple years of his life.

He had a giant ego that sustained him and enough knowledge about the game to entertain all of us. He had a certain wit & presence that many of us respected and liked.

Freddy was/is great for pool and always will be. They will be talking about him when they have forgotten about others from Chicago.

Dennis
My list is now complete.

Dennis
 

NH Steve

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Good list! I would have to think about this for a while.

I would have to put on my list for sure:

Hayden Lingo & the player that Lingo learned from
Clem Metz
Steve Cook
Fats & the player that Fats learned from (Jack Hill?)
Rags Fitzpatrick
Cornbread
Bugs <-- I did meet, so maybe that does not count, but sure would like to meet again!
 

Hard Times Carla

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Baby Face Whitlow story

Baby Face Whitlow story

Alton Baby Face Whitlow story

Back in the 70’s they had a straight pool tournament in Lansing, Mich. It was a qualifier for the US Open, and some cash too. Lots of good players.

Baby Face was playing Steve Mizerak in a quarter final game. Baby was drunk as always, tipping around, grinning from ear to ear. They were playing 150 points. Baby ran 75 with that big slip stroke, which was a thing of beauty. Like poetry in motion. He missed and Steve started running out. When Steve needed two balls, Baby suddenly fell sideways into a big metal trash can, causing a huge commotion, and Steve missed. They hoisted Baby out of the trash can, he straightened his hat, grinned, and ran 75 and out.

Carla
 
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