The opposite of over thinking?

cincy_kid

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I was watching some of that Filler one pocket match last night on Roy's (thanks again for the heads up crabb) and first I will say, I am not really familiar with him but after some later research I see he is a German pool player, 22, just won the wpa world 9 ball and something else so of course he can play..also his wife Pia plays pretty sporty from what I have seen...

One thing I noticed is he does not take very long AT ALL to pull the trigger...he looks at the situation/angles, but when he gets down to shoot its maybe one stroke and then fire!

It begs the question, do we overthink our shots when down stroking? Would a quicker release help miss less?
 

lll

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think standing up
shoot when down on the table
if you have to revise/review while down.......get up
 

cincy_kid

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yea, but did you see how fast he fires the shot once down? Like, I am wondering if the 3 or 4 or 5 practice strokes a lot of us take (some a lot more) before we stroke may be making us miss more instead of stroking more on your first instinct aim spot (if that makes sense)...
 

vapros

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A favorite subject of mine - I get the best view of the shot while I'm standing. If I get down carefully, that's the best bet for a good shot. Nothing to do then but hit it. Any changes I make after I'm down are probably going to be wrong.

Along the same line, go to YouTube and watch the little Russian player, Kristina Tkach. She does not shoot as quickly as Filler, but she makes no practice strokes at all. She holds the pose, with her cue tip up close to the ball, until she is ready to shoot. Also, a pronounced pause before hitting the ball, ala Buddy Hall, Alison Fisher and Chris Melling.
 

cincy_kid

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A favorite subject of mine - I get the best view of the shot while I'm standing. If I get down carefully, that's the best bet for a good shot. Nothing to do then but hit it. Any changes I make after I'm down are probably going to be wrong.

Along the same line, go to YouTube and watch the little Russian player, Kristina Tkach. She does not shoot as quickly as Filler, but she makes no practice strokes at all. She holds the pose, with her cue tip up close to the ball, until she is ready to shoot. Also, a pronounced pause before hitting the ball, ala Buddy Hall, Alison Fisher and Chris Melling.
Yep, that's what I was thinking...I may have to try this if whenever I can get to hit a ball again!
 

Billy Jackets

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Watch Ronnie O Sullivan play, he is undoubtedly one of the best players who ever held a cue, and he plays at an unbelievable speed. Very little wasted effort.
 

beatle

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of course too many practice stokes while lined up for the shot adds wobble to your stroke.
spend an hour or so just walking into the line of the shot and put cue down and immediately fire. that teaches your mind to get into the exact spot on the first try and be ready to shoot.
 

cincy_kid

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Watch Ronnie O Sullivan play, he is undoubtedly one of the best players who ever held a cue, and he plays at an unbelievable speed. Very little wasted effort.
Yea I have watched him play snooker quite a bit and yea he is also in that category...
 

catkins

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if your mechanics are perfect than you don't need to make sure your stroke is straight. I need to actuality adjust off the aim point and bring it back when down to make sure that I am aiming at the correct point. Though I don't think any one who has seen me shoot would say I am overly deliberate
 

Billy Jackets

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If you want to watch somebody slow, watch Gus Breseino vs. Scott Frost tonight playin 10 ball.....
I have watched Gus play several times, and he is probably the slowest player I ever watched, but how can you argue with a guys style of play, that almost never misses?
 

Erik

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Filler is a monster. And yes he won WPA world 9-ball championship, US Open 9-ball (the most recent one with 256 player field), and was runner up in WPA world 10-ball championship all in a year. In addition to obviously working very hard/practicing, he clearly just has tons of natural talent and shot making ability a la Earl Strickland or Jayson Shaw. And if you notice both of those guys play pretty quick too. I'm not sure the way those guys play would work for everyone, or is how you would want to teach a player. Their natural ability and confidence gives them the added ability to think and execute quickly (I think). I feel the kind of style of play of the Ko brothers is a better guide post to emulate, as it would be more applicable to a variety of talent levels.

According to what Roy has been posting on Facebook Filler is not afraid to play anyone in any game either. Apparently he beat Corey Deuel in a high stakes bar table 8-ball match at DCC last year, having apparently no bar table experience. And if you've ever seen Corey play bar table 8-ball, well...

Roy said on Facebook today he's been matching Filler up in one-pocket to get him seasoned, and claims he's gonna have a live stream match of him vs a former US Open one pocket winner in a couple weeks. Should be interesting to watch
 

cincy_kid

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Filler is a monster. And yes he won WPA world 9-ball championship, US Open 9-ball (the most recent one with 256 player field), and was runner up in WPA world 10-ball championship all in a year. In addition to obviously working very hard/practicing, he clearly just has tons of natural talent and shot making ability a la Earl Strickland or Jayson Shaw. And if you notice both of those guys play pretty quick too. I'm not sure the way those guys play would work for everyone, or is how you would want to teach a player. Their natural ability and confidence gives them the added ability to think and execute quickly (I think). I feel the kind of style of play of the Ko brothers is a better guide post to emulate, as it would be more applicable to a variety of talent levels.

According to what Roy has been posting on Facebook Filler is not afraid to play anyone in any game either. Apparently he beat Corey Deuel in a high stakes bar table 8-ball match at DCC last year, having apparently no bar table experience. And if you've ever seen Corey play bar table 8-ball, well...

Roy said on Facebook today he's been matching Filler up in one-pocket to get him seasoned, and claims he's gonna have a live stream match of him vs a former US Open one pocket winner in a couple weeks. Should be interesting to watch
I thought I heard he was playing Shane...
 

NH Steve

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If Filler embraces our game like Roy is saying he is, holy sh*t we are going to get a whole new wave of One Pocket fanatics right behind him, because right now he is one of the youngest tip-top in the world players that everyone else in the world is watching!! This could be huge for One Pocket!!
 

BrookelandBilly

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I was watching some of that Filler one pocket match last night on Roy's (thanks again for the heads up crabb) and first I will say, I am not really familiar with him but after some later research I see he is a German pool player, 22, just won the wpa world 9 ball and something else so of course he can play..also his wife Pia plays pretty sporty from what I have seen...

One thing I noticed is he does not take very long AT ALL to pull the trigger...he looks at the situation/angles, but when he gets down to shoot its maybe one stroke and then fire!

It begs the question, do we overthink our shots when down stroking? Would a quicker release help miss less?
I watched the entire match. I think Filler‘s pace of play actually had an effect on Aranas. Filler’s machine gun style was fascinating to watch and was in such contrast to Aranas (who is not a slow player) that it made Aranas look like he was playing very deliberate and possibly resulted in Aranas missing several not so challenging shots.
 

androd

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of course too many practice stokes while lined up for the shot adds wobble to your stroke.
spend an hour or so just walking into the line of the shot and put cue down and immediately fire. that teaches your mind to get into the exact spot on the first try and be ready to shoot.
Angus MacDonald (sarge) was one of the best players I was ever around. He was stroking the cue in front of him while he was walking around the table to his shot, when he got there he dropped down and shot. He told me it was like shooting a shotgun, your first site is your best.
P.S. Mosconi told me Mac was the best straight pool player of all the hustlers.
 
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