Really Long Pool Sessions

kollegedave

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Is there a correlation between the skill level of a player and their participation in extra long sessions of pool?

Or maybe another way to say it: Do you all think very long sessions are required or at least extremely helpful in moving from proficient amateur to a more accomplished level of play?

Those of you who are champs or former champs: Billy, San Jose Dick, Mr. Brumback, etc.; to what extent do you think really long sessions helped to improve your game?

Thanks in advance.

kollegedave
 

SJDinPHX

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Is there a correlation between the skill level of a player and their participation in extra long sessions of pool?

Or maybe another way to say it: Do you all think very long sessions are required or at least extremely helpful in moving from proficient amateur to a more accomplished level of play?

Those of you who are champs or former champs: Billy, San Jose Dick, Mr. Brumback, etc.; to what extent do you think really long sessions helped to improve your game?

Thanks in advance.

kollegedave
I loved long sessions..Most of the players of my generation, were very long winded...24 to 72 hr sessions, were not uncommon IMHO, I really don't think it had that much to do with a player's learning curve.. Just being in action daily, (or at least often) would accomplish the same thing. As Dr. Bill said, in a marathon session, whoever had the best medication, would often emerge victorious !;)

SJD
 

kollegedave

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I loved long sessions..Most of the players of my generation, were very long winded...24 to 72 hr sessions, were not uncommon IMHO, I really don't think it had that much to do with a player's learning curve.. Just being in action daily, (or at least often) would accomplish the same thing. As Dr. Bill said, in a marathon session, whoever had the best medication, would often emerge victorious !;)

SJD
Thank you for the wisdom San Jose Dick.

kollegedave
 

Scrzbill

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When I lived in San Francisco there were two pool rooms for action. Family, which was Delberts place and Daly City, which was a mostly Filipino place. Delbert had gone through a long process to keep his doors open until 4am and you could play sometimes until six am. Daly City was open from Thursday until Monday. I don't know how many times I played from Thursday until Monday but there was action all the time.
Once Baby Frank and I started playing about 4 pm on a Friday night. Saturday afternoon around 2 pm I was still up but Frank would not quit. I was exhausted and getting dizzy. Finally I said to Frank, forget the games I'm up, I'm going home. That was one of the most dangerous times I ever had driving. My head hurt, my eyes hurt and for San Francisco, it was bright. I somehow made it home and by eight the same night, I was back at it.
Did playing all those hours make me a better player? For me it wasn't about the knowledge or the expertise because I tutored under John Henderson. To me it was about winning the dough.
Lets face it, if there is a bet, I'm playing.
My favorite line when I'm playing someone is: Two AM and you want to quit? I'm just getting started!!!!:eek::eek:
 

tylerdurden

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Here is my opinion on this. Some players can play long session very well, and can just keep going. Some players can't and their games go down much sooner.

If you find you can't play long session you can either try to get good at it, or just don't play them. It is easy not to play them, the only requirement is that you have money and you can dictate terms like this because there will be nobody else in the poolroom with any money.

I know all the best guys in here will disagree with me, so maybe i am wrong no doubt, I just don't think it means much to be able to play better after playing for 30 hours. It certainly is a skill to be proud of, but not one you need in the slightest imo, unless you are looking for respect.

I like the thought of continuing sessions rather than one super long one.
 

kollegedave

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When I lived in San Francisco there were two pool rooms for action. Family, which was Delberts place and Daly City, which was a mostly Filipino place. Delbert had gone through a long process to keep his doors open until 4am and you could play sometimes until six am. Daly City was open from Thursday until Monday. I don't know how many times I played from Thursday until Monday but there was action all the time.
Once Baby Frank and I started playing about 4 pm on a Friday night. Saturday afternoon around 2 pm I was still up but Frank would not quit. I was exhausted and getting dizzy. Finally I said to Frank, forget the games I'm up, I'm going home. That was one of the most dangerous times I ever had driving. My head hurt, my eyes hurt and for San Francisco, it was bright. I somehow made it home and by eight the same night, I was back at it.
Did playing all those hours make me a better player? For me it wasn't about the knowledge or the expertise because I tutored under John Henderson. To me it was about winning the dough.
Lets face it, if there is a bet, I'm playing.
My favorite line when I'm playing someone is: Two AM and you want to quit? I'm just getting started!!!!:eek::eek:
Here is the thing. You tutored John Henderson. John Henderson plays double strong even at his age now. So you probably played pretty sporty in your day, and you like long sessions. You say it is about the money, and it may be, but don't you think it is possible that a "side effect" of being motivated by the money is that by staying in focused practice for marathon periods it may have been easier for you to improve to a very strong level than it would be for the same guy who is also motivated by the money, who also competes for the same total amount of hours, but does so with breaks common in civilized life...like meals, sleep, etc.

I hear all these stories of guys that play super strong playing insanely long sessions, and I can't help but think that there may be a benefit to the extra long session compared to the same amount of time with a break for meals, sleep, etc.

I am just throwing this out there to see what everyone says.

I am really interested to see what John Henderson would say, Billy, and John Brumback.

Kollegedave
 

SJDinPHX

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I hear all these stories of guys that play super strong playing insanely long sessions, and I can't help but think that there may be a benefit to the extra long session compared to the same amount of time with a break for meals, sleep, etc.

Kollegedave
To expound on the long session thing a bit, not all good players, liked marathon pool..Ronnie Allen, for instance, used to call it "Vampire Pool"..He would avoid it as much as possible !...I don't know where you live Dave, but I was under the impression there are very few 24 hr. pool rooms left anywhere in the country anymore. (except Vegas)

Up until the 80's, It was almost the norm.. Every big city had at least half a dozen or more !...Places like Cochran's in SF, and the Le Cue, in Houston, were probably the most prolific. The action never stopped in those places, day or night !..
I guess there are places that will stay open if they have a hot game going on. (laws permitting)... But, you just don't see player's mixing it up like that very often anymore.

So, in answer to your original question..It may be a moot point, because who is going to be able to test it out ?
..Just stay in tough action as much as you can..I think you'll improve just as fast, as you will at 'marathon' pool..
..Plus, you'll stay healthier, and have a better home life too ! ;)

SJD--Myself, I was rarely in top gear 'til after 24 hrs..2nd wind came at 48 hrs !...Of course, I have been through several wives, dozens of girl friends, and am barely able to walk unassisted.. But what would I know ? :eek: :p
 
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Scrzbill

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Here is the thing. You tutored John Henderson. John Henderson plays double strong even at his age now. So you probably played pretty sporty in your day, and you like long sessions. You say it is about the money, and it may be, but don't you think it is possible that a "side effect" of being motivated by the money is that by staying in focused practice for marathon periods it may have been easier for you to improve to a very strong level than it would be for the same guy who is also motivated by the money, who also competes for the same total amount of hours, but does so with breaks common in civilized life...like meals, sleep, etc.

I hear all these stories of guys that play super strong playing insanely long sessions, and I can't help but think that there may be a benefit to the extra long session compared to the same amount of time with a break for meals, sleep, etc.

I am just throwing this out there to see what everyone says.

I am really interested to see what John Henderson would say, Billy, and John Brumback.

Kollegedave

Breaks? Meals? Not when playing me. You get one bathroom break a session, no smokers.
Thats a very astute observation there Dave. I plan on being in the hot seat today at the one pocket tourney in Sacramento waiting for John to beat Amar.:lol:lol
 

Eengat

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Feb 28, 2014
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Is one of reasons i tell guys back home to play in USA....because of 12-15-20 hour sessions.
I strongly believe that you learn to a deeper level, when you go through couple crises during a session. At some point it becomes not just easier to let go, you just become automatic because your system is going in eco-mode and disregards all irrelevant information and emotion.
Might be somewhat different in cerebral game like one-pocket, moreso in rotation games perhaps.
 
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