Name That Player

fred bentivegna

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Wimpy did little gambling in those years

Wimpy did little gambling in those years

Terry Ardeno said:
Freddie,
Luther Lassiter won the WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP in 141. in 1966 & 1967. He won the U.S. Open 14.1 Championship in 1970 & 1971 and finished 2nd in 1973. He also won the Johnston City 1 Pocket Championship in 1969, the 1967 & 1969 Johnston City 9 Ball Championships, the 1970 & 1971 Johnston City 14.1 Championships, The ALL AROUND TITLE in Johnston City in both 1967 & 1969. He also won the ALL AROUND CHAMPIONSHIP at the Stardust Open in 1971 as well as the 1971 Stardust Open 9 Ball Championship. To say that Wimpy was at the bottom of his gambling careeer may also be construed as "TWEAKING" it a little as well.:) In fact, since Luther didn't die until October 1988, and since he never had a job after leaving the U.S. Coast Guard as a teenager, all of his income came from gambling. With the exception of royalies from his book "Billiards for Everyone" that he had published in 1965 and his other book The Modern Guide to Pocket Billiards" that was published in 1964. If he was able to compete and WIN in the aforementioned fields, why would he NOT gamble, being that he was still a powerhouse?
You are much misinformed. The main reason Wimpy stopped gambling was that he did not want a blemish on his reputation. He was regarded as the World's Nineball champ. He was more interested in giving exhibitions at $150 a pop as the reigning world champ than taking a chance of getting beaten in a short set and having his reputation tarnished. When Weanie Beanie, wanting to stake him, begged Wimpy to come to Grand Rapids and play Harold Worst nineball for 5k, Wimpy refused. He went on an exhibition tour instead. He was certainly not afraid of Worst, but he didnt want to give anybody a cheap shot at his title. Plus Wimpy knew that Worst had just dismantled his old road partner, Don Willis playing nineball. Not getting beat in public was pretty much the same reason Fats would only play to a selected audience in Johnston City. To see Fats play Ronnie or Richie Florence you had to be invited.

In all the years I spent at Johnston City, and I was there every year but the first, I only know of Wimpy gambling one time. The hustlers trapped him into giving Ronnie Allen the seven ball. Ronnie had a good game but he never got to shoot, Wimpy poured racks on him, and Ronnie had to quit. The other champion who I never seen gamble down there was Eddie Taylor. He played in a few ring nineball games but was quickly barred out. The main reason those two never played is nobody really wanted to play with them. There was plenty other action so the players just left those two alone. Wimpy would play if forced, but the bet would have to be a minimum of 10k, so the players usually looked for greener pastures. Example: when Incardona was rated the top nineball player in the country, he asked Wimpy (in front of me) for the eight ball. Wimpy didnt want anyone taking any cheap shots at him so his offer was to play 20 games ahead for 10 or 20k. He offered Cardone a four game head start to the 20 ahead. Billy declined.
That's the real history of those years, my friend.

the Beard
 

fred bentivegna

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I said you got the book

I said you got the book

Terry Ardeno said:
Freddie,
I PROMISE I'm not trying to be a smart%#$ nor a pest. But, your previous post to me stated I won the shirt. Very much appreciated. But, I held off on getting the GosPool because I wanted it for after June 16. This is our 1st vacation since 1998 and I wanted to have it to read then. If I got it before then, I would have it done in a day or so. So here's my question...Did I win the GosPool also? If not, I still love you the same and I'll just ordet a copy.

If I did win the book (which I'm really hoping for, hint-hint) than would you mind inscibing something inside? Preferably something that when I die and my kids pick thru my books and read it, they won't think you hate me...:)
Even with the tweaking of Squirrel, Taylor and Wimpy, I will concede shirt and book. I still need a size and address.

the Beard
 

Terry Ardeno

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fred bentivegna said:
You are much misinformed. The main reason Wimpy stopped gambling was that he did not want a blemish on his reputation. He was regarded as the World's Nineball champ. He was more interested in giving exhibitions at $150 a pop as the reigning world champ than taking a chance of getting beaten in a short set and having his reputation tarnished. When Weanie Beanie, wanting to stake him, begged Wimpy to come to Grand Rapids and play Harold Worst nineball for 5k, Wimpy refused. He went on an exhibition tour instead. He was certainly not afraid of Worst, but he didnt want to give anybody a cheap shot at his title. Plus Wimpy knew that Worst had just dismantled his old road partner, Don Willis playing nineball. Not getting beat in public was pretty much the same reason Fats would only play to a selected audience in Johnston City. To see Fats play Ronnie or Richie Florence you had to be invited.

In all the years I spent at Johnston City, and I was there every year but the first, I only know of Wimpy gambling one time. The hustlers trapped him into giving Ronnie Allen the seven ball. Ronnie had a good game but he never got to shoot, Wimpy poured racks on him, and Ronnie had to quit. The other champion who I never seen gamble down there was Eddie Taylor. He played in a few ring nineball games but was quickly barred out. The main reason those two never played is nobody really wanted to play with them. There was plenty other action so the players just left those two alone. Wimpy would play if forced, but the bet would have to be a minimum of 10k, so the players usually looked for greener pastures. Example: when Incardona was rated the top nineball player in the country, he asked Wimpy (in front of me) for the eight ball. Wimpy didnt want anyone taking any cheap shots at him so his offer was to play 20 games ahead for 10 or 20k. He offered Cardone a four game head start to the 20 ahead. Billy declined.
That's the real history of those years, my friend.

the Beard
Freddie,
This is fascinating to hear. I never knew or heard from any source that he ever did more than a handful of exibitions in his life. The book "Hustler Days" by R.A. Dyer is very biographical on Lassiter (and Jersey Red & Fats) and it was never mentioned once. I have every Sport's Illistrated article on Lassiter from the early 60's on, as well as all the material on him from Billiards Digest, Pool & Billiard Magazine and the National Billiard News and I never read or heard that before, (that he did so many exibitions to supplement his income).
I do know for a fact that he "retired" from major tournament pool in 1975.

Funny stuff on Incardona.

Terry
 

Terry Ardeno

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fred bentivegna said:
Even with the tweaking of Squirrel, Taylor and Wimpy, I will concede shirt and book. I still need a size and address.

the Beard
Freddie,
I sent you a rather lengthly e-mail to bankingwiththebeard@comcast.net.
Thank you very, very much not only for the items but for answering all these posts. I learned a lot of new things about some of the players. And thanks for loving our great sport like you do.
Your friend,
Terry
 

fred bentivegna

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I happened to be around at that time

I happened to be around at that time

Terry Ardeno said:
Freddie,
This is fascinating to hear. I never knew or heard from any source that he ever did more than a handful of exibitions in his life. The book "Hustler Days" by R.A. Dyer is very biographical on Lassiter (and Jersey Red & Fats) and it was never mentioned once. I have every Sport's Illistrated article on Lassiter from the early 60's on, as well as all the material on him from Billiards Digest, Pool & Billiard Magazine and the National Billiard News and I never read or heard that before, (that he did so many exibitions to supplement his income).
I do know for a fact that he "retired" from major tournament pool in 1975.

Funny stuff on Incardona.

Terry
Keep in mind R A Dyer got his info second hand. I was there when those things happened. $150 a day was a big buck in the 60s.

the Beard
 

jay helfert

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I just wrote a super long response to this thread that dropped out when I tried to post it. I worked on it for about an hour. I'm not ready to try to duplicate it again. VERY frustrating. Sorry Freddie. That is an impressive list. I had at least a dozen names for you, and stories about all of them.

How come you never played Cuban Joe or Beenie? Or Jack Perkins, a good One Pocket man, Hawaiian Brian or Ray Booth (you must have known him). They were the first ones that came to mind. San Jose Dick and Chuck Morgan were two more you should have run into. Other notable black players you missed were Texas Shorty and Rush Out Red. I'm with you on nicknames. Knew some guys for 30 years and never knew their real name.

Maybe I'll try again later. I played many of your guys plus a zillion shortstops not on your list. Bill Mielke, Junior Harris, Jim Williams, "Wino" from N. Cal., Peter Gunn, Bakersfield Bobby, Crazy Bruce from Miami, Jerry Mackey and Rich Geiler from the Northwest, Hawaii Jay, Howard Ikeda and Bill Stigall and Johnny Dollar from Ohio.

Junior Goff and Howard Barrett were still around until the late 70's, early 80's. Jimmy Moore too if you went to Albuquerque. No one gambled with Lassiter or I. Crane. Who in their right mind would play 9-Ball or 14.1 with these two guys. I'll expand on this later.
 
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jay helfert

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The scoop on Lassiter is accurate. After about 1970 he never gambled with anyone. He was content to have the reputation as the greatest living 9-Ball player, and play in tournaments and get paid $100 a day to hang around someone's poolroom (True). In the 60's, no one wanted to mess with him at 9-Ball or 14.1. Why? He WAS simply the best for money or in tournaments.

He sat on the bench in the back room at Johnston City for years waiting for someone to ask him to play. It never happened, until Worst came along. And even he wanted him to come to Grand Rapids to play. They did come close to getting it on in Johnston City in '65 or '66. If Lassiter wasn't winning the 9-Ball and 14.1 divisions (undefeated in both), it may have happened.

Irving Crane, same story. I never heard of him gambling after 1960. He was too respectable by then and had money. But he was a proud man, and I suspect if someone asked him to play Straight Pool he would have obliged them. But who in their right mind would pick him for a 14.1 game. Only Lassiter and Balsis were in his league in the 60's. When he showed up in Johnston City, the hustlers always treated him with utmost respect. Trust me, neither Ervolino, Jersey Red, Shorty, Ronnie, Cornbread or any other player had any interest in even discussing Straight Pool with this man. He might just get up and play. Then you were dead!

A small footnote to the above: Caras and Cranfield also still played high speed 14.1 in the 60's, but they had no interest in gambling or even going to Johnston City. Mosconi may have played well then also, but he was content to play his exhibitions and be "WILLIE MOSCONI". He and Crane had played several Challenge Matches over the years, which were considered World Championships, and both had won a couple.
 
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Fatboy

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fred bentivegna said:
Never played Jack Perkins. He was very careful who he played anyway. Keith Ryan, I didnt know him. Tangled with all the rest.

the Beard
Jack Perkins was my thought when I first read about this thread on the other forum, the reason he popped in to my thought is the only time I saw him actually get out of line was to play Grady in Vegas in 93 when Grady spent about 3-4 weeks in Vegas. And Grady posts here so that was my connection to him, strange. Other than that game I never saw him gamble he is a lock-up artist on a good day and a degenerate casino gambler,go figure. I saw him about 8 months ago in the bathroom at the Mirage, first time I saw him since 94. You didnt miss anything not playing him. I know i'm late with this and i dont want anything anyways I hope you like my story.

great thread.
 

fred bentivegna

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You nailed a few

You nailed a few

jay helfert said:
I just wrote a super long response to this thread that dropped out when I tried to post it. I worked on it for about an hour. I'm not ready to try to duplicate it again. VERY frustrating. Sorry Freddie. That is an impressive list. I had at least a dozen names for you, and stories about all of them.

How come you never played Cuban Joe or Beenie? Or Jack Perkins, a good One Pocket man, Hawaiian Brian or Ray Booth (you must have known him). They were the first ones that came to mind. San Jose Dick and Chuck Morgan were two more you should have run into. Other notable black players you missed were Texas Shorty and Rush Out Red. I'm with you on nicknames. Knew some guys for 30 years and never knew their real name.

Maybe I'll try again later. I played many of your guys plus a zillion shortstops not on your list. Bill Mielke, Junior Harris, Jim Williams, "Wino" from N. Cal., Peter Gunn, Bakersfield Bobby, Crazy Bruce from Miami, Jerry Mackey and Rich Geiler from the Northwest, Hawaii Jay, Howard Ikeda and Bill Stigall and Johnny Dollar from Ohio.

Junior Goff and Howard Barrett were still around until the late 70's, early 80's. Jimmy Moore too if you went to Albuquerque. No one gambled with Lassiter or I. Crane. Who in their right mind would play 9-Ball or 14.1 with these two guys. I'll expand on this later.
Never ran into San Jose Dick until the mid 90s. Never ran into Chuck Morgan either. Would have ducked both of them anyway, they were both monsters. No Onepocket for sure. I kinda recall playing Bill Mielke and Jim Williams, but I aint sure. Rich Geiler, Bill Stigall and Johnny Dollar I did play. Crazy Bruce I think I did play in Miami, but I know we didnt play in Hollywood.

You got a couple, but a few were already taken. I emboldened the ones I didnt play. Ray Booth and I played plenty. Very funny man.
Straight pool with Crane? He and Balsis played a 2000 point match. Balsis had the high run every day and ran several 200's. Balsis had a 1000 pt lead but Crane ground him out with 50s and 60s. The final score was Crane 2000, Balsis 1970!

the Beard
 
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CaptainHook

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jay helfert said:
I just wrote a super long response to this thread that dropped out when I tried to post it. I worked on it for about an hour. I'm not ready to try to duplicate it again. VERY frustrating. Sorry Freddie. That is an impressive list. I had at least a dozen names for you, and stories about all of them.

How come you never played Cuban Joe or Beenie? Or Jack Perkins, a good One Pocket man, Hawaiian Brian or Ray Booth (you must have known him). They were the first ones that came to mind. San Jose Dick and Chuck Morgan were two more you should have run into. Other notable black players you missed were Texas Shorty and Rush Out Red. I'm with you on nicknames. Knew some guys for 30 years and never knew their real name.

Maybe I'll try again later. I played many of your guys plus a zillion shortstops not on your list. Bill Mielke, Junior Harris, Jim Williams, "Wino" from N. Cal., Peter Gunn, Bakersfield Bobby, Crazy Bruce from Miami, Jerry Mackey and Rich Geiler from the Northwest, Hawaii Jay, Howard Ikeda and Bill Stigall and Johnny Dollar from Ohio.

Junior Goff and Howard Barrett were still around until the late 70's, early 80's. Jimmy Moore too if you went to Albuquerque. No one gambled with Lassiter or I. Crane. Who in their right mind would play 9-Ball or 14.1 with these two guys. I'll expand on this later.
Junoir "Lefty" Goff and "WD" Bill Stigall lived at Bakers in Tampa in the 70's.
I would get my mom to drop me off on her way into work during the summer and hang out all day. When they closed up Dale Mabry billiards Steve Cook
came to Bakers also. He is the one that taught me to play 1P. Lefty always had a golf game going on the snooker table. "WD" helped me to organize the first tournament I ran at a local apartment complex. I still have his business cards in with my keepsakes.

Steve, myself and lefty were the only guys around with "Palmers" back then, it was like we were in a secret club.
 

jay helfert

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fred bentivegna said:
Never ran into San Jose Dick until the mid 90s. Never ran into Chuck Morgan either. Would have ducked both of them anyway, they were both monsters. No Onepocket for sure. I kinda recall playing Bill Mielke and Jim Williams, but I aint sure. Rich Geiler, Bill Stigall and Johnny Dollar I did play. Crazy Bruce I think I did play in Miami, but I know we didnt play in Hollywood.

You got a couple, but a few were already taken. I emboldened the ones I didnt play. Ray Booth and I played plenty. Very funny man.
Straight pool with Crane? He and Balsis played a 2000 point match. Balsis had the high run every day and ran several 200's. Balsis had a 1000 pt lead but Crane ground him out with 50s and 60s. The final score was Crane 2000, Balsis 1970!

the Beard
You're right about Dick and Chuck Morgan. World beaters both. It would take someone named Shorty or Red to get their money. Crazy Bruce was movie star handsome from a "money" family, but a raving lunatic when losing. I played him several times in L.A. He was a terrific Eight Ball player, but if you could get him mad, he was going off.

I figured you played Ray Booth, just left him off your report. EVERYONE played Ray Booth somewhere! He's like Popcorn that way. Jim Williams was a low key guy, who was mostly West Coast, but did travel East on an occasion or two. I saw him at the Dayton tournament once sneaking around. No one knew him and he played very good. Looked like a local businessman, dressed very sharp and clean. Kind of the Pete Glenn type if you remember him. Pete was a great money player in the Midwest in the 50's, 60's and 70's. His sons Denny and Steve own the world's biggest and most valubable cue collection. They live in Houston.
 

jay helfert

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Okay Freddie, a few more for you. You must have run into Paul Baker out of Iowa. He was a road man for decades from the 60's on. His hustle was to go into a poolroom and claim to be a golf hustler (which he was also). He was a strong shortstop speed. About my height, clean cut and had a lot of gamble. He would be in his 60's now. Was a mentor to Scott Kitto and Don McCoy.

Billy Ray Suden was another longtime road man you missed. Most everyone ran into him somewhere. He broke his cue in my Bakersfield poolroom after I came back from 9-2 to win a $200 set 11-10. He has been "dead" a few times.

Was Jimmy King on your list? I have to look again. What about "Bionic" Frank Jonik and Bernie Mikkalsen, a couple of Canandian road men. Mark Maryo out of Cleveland would gamble at One Pocket, just not too high, 50 or 100 a game limit. Dave Bollman also would play One Hole and even some Banks. I know your paths must have crossed more than once. What about Kim Davenport, a serious gambler. More noted for his 9-Ball skills, but will play One Pocket as well.

From Florida, John Ditoro and Tom Brown were a road team in the 80's. They went thru the Midwest back then. You mention Chicago area players like Tommy Spencer and George Michaels. What about Tom Karabotsas, Joey Gold, John Abruzzo and John Zaksas?

Old timers Johhny Edwards and Johnny Taylor out of Kentucky were still on the road well into the 70's. And I remember the other good black player from Milwaukee. Was it Eddie Brown? In California John Henderson never passed up a game with anyone.

I won't hold you to playing any of the bar table specialists who abounded. Sergio, Mario, Al Nicaragua, Lumphead and Litttle Oscar were killers. And Cannela out of Texas was the best ever, until he got hooked on smack. He beat Sigel and played Buddy to a standstill.

Oh well that's enough for now.
 

jay helfert

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Fatboy said:
Jack Perkins was my thought when I first read about this thread on the other forum, the reason he popped in to my thought is the only time I saw him actually get out of line was to play Grady in Vegas in 93 when Grady spent about 3-4 weeks in Vegas. And Grady posts here so that was my connection to him, strange. Other than that game I never saw him gamble he is a lock-up artist on a good day and a degenerate casino gambler,go figure. I saw him about 8 months ago in the bathroom at the Mirage, first time I saw him since 94. You didnt miss anything not playing him. I know i'm late with this and i dont want anything anyways I hope you like my story.

great thread.
If Grady messed with Jack long enough, Jack would get the cash. He was good that way, out maneuvering people. And he played jam up One Pocket.
And good 9-Ball too.
 

jay helfert

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fred bentivegna said:
Never ran into San Jose Dick until the mid 90s. Never ran into Chuck Morgan either. Would have ducked both of them anyway, they were both monsters. No Onepocket for sure. I kinda recall playing Bill Mielke and Jim Williams, but I aint sure. Rich Geiler, Bill Stigall and Johnny Dollar I did play. Crazy Bruce I think I did play in Miami, but I know we didnt play in Hollywood.

You got a couple, but a few were already taken. I emboldened the ones I didnt play. Ray Booth and I played plenty. Very funny man.
Straight pool with Crane? He and Balsis played a 2000 point match. Balsis had the high run every day and ran several 200's. Balsis had a 1000 pt lead but Crane ground him out with 50s and 60s. The final score was Crane 2000, Balsis 1970!

the Beard
You would remember Bill Mielke from Milwaukee, a good all around player. Same height as me, maybe an inch taller 5'8". Stocky build, soft spoken. Short clippy stroke like Hopkins, but very accurate. He was a full time player and gambler, who traveled the world like Junior Harris. You must have run into Brian somewhere too. He got around good. Played good too, and gambled great. "Wino" was Richard Winesettle out of Northern California. He was a big rig driver and criss crossed the country hauling loads and playing pool. Shortstop speed but loved the action. Liked a little $40 or $50 One Pocket game in the 70's when it was a decent bet. Nice guy who just liked to play. Never knew him to beef with anyone.

Oh, I left out Billy Teeters from Ventura, CA. He played a nice shortstop speed and had a lot of gamble. I played him several times. He was pretty much West Coast his whole career, always owning bars and small poolrooms.
 
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fred bentivegna

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A couple more

A couple more

jay helfert said:
Okay Freddie, a few more for you. You must have run into Paul Baker out of Iowa. He was a road man for decades from the 60's on. His hustle was to go into a poolroom and claim to be a golf hustler (which he was also). He was a strong shortstop speed. About my height, clean cut and had a lot of gamble. He would be in his 60's now. Was a mentor to Scott Kitto and Don McCoy. ( Paul Baker. I finished 2d to him in a big 9ball tournament in Chicago.)
Billy Ray Suden was another longtime road man you missed. Most everyone ran into him somewhere. He broke his cue in my Bakersfield poolroom after I came back from 9-2 to win a $200 set 11-10. He has been "dead" a few times.

Was Jimmy King on your list? I have to look again. (Probably, but I cant remember where. ) What about "Bionic" Frank Jonik and Bernie Mikkalsen, a couple of Canandian road men. Mark Maryo out of Cleveland would gamble at One Pocket, just not too high, 50 or 100 a game limit. (No, to all three.) Dave Bollman also would play One Hole and even some Banks. I know your paths must have crossed more than once. (We would play at the tournaments.) What about Kim Davenport, a serious gambler. More noted for his 9-Ball skills, but will play One Pocket as well. (At the tourney in St. Charles IL, Kim wanted 9 to 8 playing OnePocket or banks but would give me the five ball playing 9ball.)
From Florida, John Ditoro and Tom Brown were a road team in the 80's. They went thru the Midwest back then. (Never ran into them.) You mention Chicago area players like Tommy Spencer and George Michaels. What about Tom Karabotsas, Joey Gold, John Abruzzo and John Zaksas? (Of course.)

Old timers Johhny Edwards and Johnny Taylor out of Kentucky were still on the road well into the 70's. (Went to Johnny Edwards home pool room, was it in Owensborough? Played Johnny Taylor in Johnston City. Edwards played much better.) And I remember the other good black player from Milwaukee. Was it Eddie Brown? (You are thinking of Eddie Mathews. Naturally we got down.) In California John Henderson never passed up a game with anyone. (I dont think we ever played.)

I won't hold you to playing any of the bar table specialists who abounded. Sergio, (played at 4th and Main].) Mario, Al, (Al Romero? Yes). Nicaragua, Lumphead and Litttle Oscar were killers. And Cannela out of Texas was the best ever, until he got hooked on smack. He beat Sigel and played Buddy to a standstill. (Played Cannela 8 ball in Chicago. He spotted me and lost. He was the only guy to beat Artie playing 8 ball.)

Oh well that's enough for now.
You can count all the boldened ones.

the Beard
 
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fred bentivegna

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Now I remember

Now I remember

jay helfert said:
You would remember Bill Mielke from Milwaukee, a good all around player. Same height as me, maybe an inch taller 5'8". Stocky build, soft spoken. Short clippy stroke like Hopkins, but very accurate. He was a full time player and gambler, who traveled the world like Junior Harris. You must have run into Brian somewhere too. He got around good. Played good too, and gambled great. "Wino" was Richard Winesettle out of Northern California. He was a big rig driver and criss crossed the country hauling loads and playing pool. Shortstop speed but loved the action. Liked a little $40 or $50 One Pocket game in the 70's when it was a decent bet. Nice guy who just liked to play. Never knew him to beef with anyone.

Oh, I left out Billy Teeters from Ventura, CA. He played a nice shortstop speed and had a lot of gamble. I played him several times. He was pretty much West Coast his whole career, always owning bars and small poolrooms.
Now I remember Bill Mielke. We played. Local Shortstops are too much of a stretch Jay. You got a shirt coming anyway.

the Beard
 

gulfportdoc

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jay helfert said:
And I remember the other good black player from Milwaukee. Was it Eddie Brown?
There's a black player named Eddie Brown in New Orleans. Been around there for years. Plays all games strong-- about like Lil John, only better at banks.

Doc
 

gulfportdoc

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fred bentivegna said:
Now I remember Bill Mielke. We played. Local Shortstops are too much of a stretch Jay.
Freddie, I suspect Jay remembers every gambling session he ever had. But remember he was on the natch, so he's still got most of his brain left...:D

Doc
once went to a 30-year-long party
 

hemicudas

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jay helfert said:
Okay Freddie, a few more for you. You must have run into Paul Baker out of Iowa. He was a road man for decades from the 60's on. His hustle was to go into a poolroom and claim to be a golf hustler (which he was also). He was a strong shortstop speed. About my height, clean cut and had a lot of gamble. He would be in his 60's now. Was a mentor to Scott Kitto and Don McCoy.

Billy Ray Suden was another longtime road man you missed. Most everyone ran into him somewhere. He broke his cue in my Bakersfield poolroom after I came back from 9-2 to win a $200 set 11-10. He has been "dead" a few times.

Was Jimmy King on your list? I have to look again. What about "Bionic" Frank Jonik and Bernie Mikkalsen, a couple of Canandian road men. Mark Maryo out of Cleveland would gamble at One Pocket, just not too high, 50 or 100 a game limit. Dave Bollman also would play One Hole and even some Banks. I know your paths must have crossed more than once. What about Kim Davenport, a serious gambler. More noted for his 9-Ball skills, but will play One Pocket as well.

From Florida, John Ditoro and Tom Brown were a road team in the 80's. They went thru the Midwest back then. You mention Chicago area players like Tommy Spencer and George Michaels. What about Tom Karabotsas, Joey Gold, John Abruzzo and John Zaksas?

Old timers Johhny Edwards and Johnny Taylor out of Kentucky were still on the road well into the 70's. And I remember the other good black player from Milwaukee. Was it Eddie Brown? In California John Henderson never passed up a game with anyone.

I won't hold you to playing any of the bar table specialists who abounded. Sergio, Mario, Al Nicaragua, Lumphead and Litttle Oscar were killers. And Cannela out of Texas was the best ever, until he got hooked on smack. He beat Sigel and played Buddy to a standstill.

Oh well that's enough for now.
Which Jimmy King are you refering to, Jay? There are at least two that I know of. the left handed one from AL and the right handed one from Oak Park Billiards in Chicago. Is there another?.........Eddie Mathews, from Milwaukee??? He was their HOF third baseman. What about Erman Bullard and Billy Weir, both from TX?
 
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jay helfert

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gulfportdoc said:
There's a black player named Eddie Brown in New Orleans. Been around there for years. Plays all games strong-- about like Lil John, only better at banks.

Doc
Did he used to live in Phoenix?
 
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