Kick break

Jeff sparks

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Apr 2, 2015
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Been using this one rail kick break lately, in between the 2nd & 3rd balls in the stack. I sell out the corner ball once in about every 6 or 7 breaks but usually it's only a 1 or 2 ball sell out. The rest of the time the CB is buried in the stack and I've got 4 to 6 balls open on my side, sometimes with one in the jaws.

I know this break has been around for a long time, I'm just curious why you don't see anybody using it. I never scratch, and seldom sell out and the CB is always froze in the stack. Anyone have thoughts about this break?
 

LSJohn

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Aug 15, 2013
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Been using this one rail kick break lately, in between the 2nd & 3rd balls in the stack. I sell out the corner ball once in about every 6 or 7 breaks but usually it's only a 1 or 2 ball sell out. The rest of the time the CB is buried in the stack and I've got 4 to 6 balls open on my side, sometimes with one in the jaws.

I know this break has been around for a long time, I'm just curious why you don't see anybody using it. I never scratch, and seldom sell out and the CB is always froze in the stack. Anyone have thoughts about this break?
I used to play a guy who used it about half the time. The only times I recall having trouble getting out of it were when we were playing on new or otherwise faster-than-normal cloth. Maybe you're hitting them a little harder and more accurately than he did.

It does seem to have enough merit that I would expect to see it once in a while, but I never do from anyone but that guy.
 

Disco Dave

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Nov 16, 2015
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Jeff,

I think you've let the cat out of the bag for your opponents in the upcoming Seniors Tournament. :) Now they'll be ready for you.

I've seen you using this break to success over the last 5 or 6 weeks.

I used to use it about 15 years ago. I saw it in the "Winning One Pocket (WOP)" companion to the SMS. "Eddie Kelly's reaction when seeing a diagram of it was "Not with a gun to my head".

However, your recent success with it has more likely been helped by the current slow playing conditions of the tables you've been playing on. WOP mentions that this break is especially suited for slow, humid tables where the usual break may sell out easier.

It's not a difficult break to learn and you've been getting good results with it. It also has a surprise effect on people who are to familiar with it and may also force people into kicking on their return shot making it harder for them to equalize quickly.

A similarly off-putting break is one I've seen 9-ball George use where he manages to freeze the cue to the head ball. This is also mentioned in WOP.
 

Miller

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Aug 18, 2010
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u12armwresl in indy swears by the kick break.

there was a wwyd responding to a kick break a while back. as unconventional as the break, i've always felt a good return shot if he doesnt bury you is to draw back off the long rail and put him in front of his pocket while inevitably moving some traffic a little bit up table but to your side.

I think kollegdave played a guy from TX at DCC who used it (he was playing with an original/unconverted brass joint hoppe brunswick).
 

Cowboy Dennis

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Dec 16, 2008
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Been using this one rail kick break lately, in between the 2nd & 3rd balls in the stack. I sell out the corner ball once in about every 6 or 7 breaks but usually it's only a 1 or 2 ball sell out. The rest of the time the CB is buried in the stack and I've got 4 to 6 balls open on my side, sometimes with one in the jaws.

I know this break has been around for a long time, I'm just curious why you don't see anybody using it. I never scratch, and seldom sell out and the CB is always froze in the stack. Anyone have thoughts about this break?
Yes, people have thoughts on it but as you can see not many are going to post them in public.

It's good if it helps you to beat the people you play.

P.S. You don't see anybody using it because it's worthless against anyone who can play.

Dennis
 

LSJohn

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Aug 15, 2013
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Jeff,

I think you've let the cat out of the bag for your opponents in the upcoming Seniors Tournament. :) Now they'll be ready for you.

I've seen you using this break to success over the last 5 or 6 weeks.

I used to use it about 15 years ago. I saw it in the "Winning One Pocket (WOP)" companion to the SMS. "Eddie Kelly's reaction when seeing a diagram of it was "Not with a gun to my head".

However, your recent success with it has more likely been helped by the current slow playing conditions of the tables you've been playing on. WOP mentions that this break is especially suited for slow, humid tables where the usual break may sell out easier.

It's not a difficult break to learn and you've been getting good results with it. It also has a surprise effect on people who are to familiar with it and may also force people into kicking on their return shot making it harder for them to equalize quickly.

A similarly off-putting break is one I've seen 9-ball George use where he manages to freeze the cue to the head ball. This is also mentioned in WOP.
When I played against it the guy almost never got a ball in front of his pocket. Maybe he just wasn't confident enough in it to hit 'em at proper speed.

I can't imagine, though, why a slower table would be better for it.
 

Jeff sparks

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Apr 2, 2015
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Ok,
I went back and read the links so generously provided by Larry and Dennis.
In one of those links the Ghost describes the table and weather conditions that are conducive to the success of the kick break. I have been playing on tables exactly like he describes and weather conditions very similar also. There in lies the explanation of why this break has been treating me so well lately.

I haven't tried it out on dry tables with clean newly polished balls yet, but I'm thinking it won't be necessary because the desired effect would not be achieved without the wet conditions. I will go back to the conventional break when conditions warrant it.

Thanks
 

u12armresl

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Jan 6, 2008
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399
I do love that break, but it takes work and time.

The end result should be that there are 5 balls on your side in various positions, and one ball comes out on their side, however, it can't be made. Almost, but you just can't see enough of it.

In all of my experimenting with that break, I've figured out 3 different breaks.
A different one from the above one is for it to hit the second ball, and roll down towards your opponents pocket.
I decided against this one because it leaves an immediate clearing out shot, if not a cross corner.

To add to it, yes I play it in tournaments, yes I play it for $$$, used it against Ike, the Chicago boys, DCC, etc. Heck if Danny had more patience, I was showing him how to make it work, and he acted like he knew everything.

Can you imagine a player of his caliber freezing the cue ball to the pack and putting 5 balls near his hole. The bark against the break is always it's too easy to get out of, but someone will have to show me, as I've not seen anyone do it effectively over the long haul.

Haven't touched a stick since last September though.
 

u12armresl

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Jan 6, 2008
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I'll just say um, YES it is a difficult break to learn...

QUOTE=Disco Dave;178011]Jeff,

It's not a difficult break to learn and you've been getting good results with it. It also has a surprise effect on people who are to familiar with it and may also force people into kicking on their return shot making it harder for them to equalize quickly.

A similarly off-putting break is one I've seen 9-ball George use where he manages to freeze the cue to the head ball. This is also mentioned in WOP.[/QUOTE]
 

Disco Dave

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Nov 16, 2015
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I'll just say um, YES it is a difficult break to learn..
Actually, um, NOT difficult provide you actually invest some time practicing your break as you would practice any other shot. Most people I have seen only work on their break in game situations. Also every table and room conditions are different, so just as one tests the rails and banks on unfamiliar equipment, so should you practice the break as well. Even the "standard" break produces different results on different tables/rooms. When I went to the DCC, I got up early and spent an hour just working on my break before playing.
 
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