Dress code

Scrzbill

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Reading that appraisal of Doc's dress when he was hustling reminds me of a few times when I dressed to get action. Now, I don't even show in Incadona's shadow, but when I moved from Kentucky to Fast Eddy's in Santa Cruz I played pretty sporting. My best is matching up. I picked up my nickname "Kentucky" at Fast Eddys because I kept my name close. They knew where I went to school and that's about all. I was action, you could see the cash in my pocket and occasionally pulled out a roll to buy a drink. For a small joint, Fast Eddys had some players to mix it up. Bus drivers, carpenters, cops, teachers would all be lurking for a huckleberry like me. Lettuce, The Brothers Crenshaw who married beautiful twins. Rich, A counterfitter who tried to pass off a couple of his own. Hustlers, my breed. Now I been told that I played with a hayseed in my mouth but I don't remember it. For the first three or four weeks I was in town, Eddys opened at 11AM. They closed 2ish. I had a collection of long striped shirts and two pair of hip hugger checked pants which I rotated. 11:05 I stop in for breakfast and get to know the lunch crowd. Then off to the beach for a few hours to work on my California look. Back to Eddys, just a few blocks from the hookers and the beach. Afternoon free lunch, happy hour crowd. Of course I played a little pool by myself, drinking, being anti-social. Which is hard to imagine. Done with practice, more beers. Evening crowd at Eddys was a mad capp. They had lines of people out the door. There I was half hick, half unknown. It took a couple of days to find where and who I could lose too and gain show action. Like I said, I am not a world beater, but I like to play. For the dough. In my red striped, black stripped shirt. Checked blue, black, white. hip hugger pants. Tennis shoes and most of the time, occasionally, a hat. Hustlers dress in ways to bring around the bees, to drink the nectar. I gave up the stripes and checked and went with a more California shine dress after going to work. The Rennaisance Faire. I ended up in a job as one of their front men. There is a saying in hustling, A,B,C. Always be closing. If you expect to make a life of living off the land, then you have to have a mantra to live by. So I used my nefarious hustling abilities for Coat and tie meetings with the Golden Gate, Hiway Patrol, Railroads people. And then to the pool room, to the pool room. Always and foremost, the pool room where your true love waits. For about ten years, I played at Eddys as often as I could. The hustlers mentality is inside and outside. I didn't know crap about any of the things I was doing, but it wasn't much different than a new pool room. Keep em guessing.
 

vapros

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With a preamble like that, you should be bringing us stories.
 

beatle

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suki who no longer posts for the last 5 years or so used to own fast eddies. he was getting old, miss his posts.

si, who is or was a treacherous gambler owned a room there for a time. eventually moved to vegas as he burned his time around there up.

i used to stop at fast eddies for a quick score and go to the big room i forgot the name in san jose which had great action for a time. and liked to bullshit with poker paul. the pok.
 

Bob Jewett

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... and go to the big room i forgot the name in san jose which had great action for a time. and liked to bullshit with poker paul. the pok.
That would be the original California Billiards at 280, Stevens Creek, and Lawrence Expressway. It's a grocery store again. If that's the place you mean, here it is in a movie:
-- start at 7:02
The balls were painted on the front of the building (and the sign changed) just for the movie.

I think the guy in the red shirt in the first scene inside is Jack Madden.
 
Last edited:

beatle

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yep thats jack madden. he still plays pool but his fame now is making cues. he makes one of the best hitting cues and not overpriced. he lives up in northern montana. played in the stardust tournaments in the 70's.
very good player and gambler.
is edgies where you still hang out and play 3 cushion.
 

Scrzbill

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suki who no longer posts for the last 5 years or so used to own fast eddies. he was getting old, miss his posts.

si, who is or was a treacherous gambler owned a room there for a time. eventually moved to vegas as he burned his time around there up.

i used to stop at fast eddies for a quick score and go to the big room i forgot the name in san jose which had great action for a time. and liked to bullshit with poker paul. the pok.
I was in with the original Fast Eddys owners who ran into a tax situation which I helped them, so they gave me a small piece. Then some Chicago boys bought it and turned on the overhead lights which ruined the ambience of the place. They bought for $100K and sold for $60K two years later. Dick bought it and the family still owns and operates it. If you scored at Eddys, you have to play pretty good. There are some real players still lurking there. FYI, Dick and Susie both passed. It has been a few years.
 

mr3cushion

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I remember distinctly the movie, 'Kiss Shot' was made in 89, I was manager of Hollywood Billiards from 87-90. But much of this movie was filmed at, 'North Hollywood Billiards' owned at that time by, NJ, outfit guy, Larry Weir, most of the 3C players hung out there, so did I. His morning counterman was, Chuck, and he loved good cigars and horse racing. He and Charlie Millikin would go often. Chuck opened the room at 7:00 am, he got very friendly with Whoopi Goldberg, she use to bring him, 'Cubans' went they shot scenes there. Jerry Breiseth, Madison, WI. was the, 'pool technical adviser' for the film
 

gulfportdoc

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Reading that appraisal of Doc's dress when he was hustling reminds me of a few times when I dressed to get action. Now, I don't even show in Incadona's shadow, but when I moved from Kentucky to Fast Eddy's in Santa Cruz I played pretty sporting. My best is matching up. I picked up my nickname "Kentucky" at Fast Eddys because I kept my name close. They knew where I went to school and that's about all. I was action, you could see the cash in my pocket and occasionally pulled out a roll to buy a drink. For a small joint, Fast Eddys had some players to mix it up.
...
Bill, I'm wondering if Fast Eddy's was the name of the room I played at a bunch of times in Sta Cruz when I lived up in Ben Lomand in '71-72? It was on a main drag, but I've long forgotten the street name. I was fresh from Tiff Payne's in N. Hyd, and could play a decent 3C game. I used to play the owner at the Sta Cruz joint for a few bucks and beers, because there weren't a lot of 3C players around then. The bucks I'd beat him for (usually) was my cigarette and booze money. They had a decent rock club in town at the time, so we were treated well.
 

beatle

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fast eddies is really in capitola which is next to santa cruz.
over the years there has been a couple rooms in santa cruz. one was right off the main drag. might still be there.
 

12squared

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That would be the original California Billiards at 280, Stevens Creek, and Lawrence Expressway. It's a grocery store again. If that's the place you mean, here it is in a movie:
-- start at 7:02
The balls were painted on the front of the building (and the sign changed) just for the movie.

I think the guy in the red shirt in the first scene inside is Jack Madden.
That brought back memories, not the movie, the room. Thanks
 

12squared

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Reading that appraisal of Doc's dress when he was hustling reminds me of a few times when I dressed to get action. Now, I don't even show in Incadona's shadow, but when I moved from Kentucky to Fast Eddy's in Santa Cruz I played pretty sporting. My best is matching up. I picked up my nickname "Kentucky" at Fast Eddys because I kept my name close. They knew where I went to school and that's about all. I was action, you could see the cash in my pocket and occasionally pulled out a roll to buy a drink. For a small joint, Fast Eddys had some players to mix it up. Bus drivers, carpenters, cops, teachers would all be lurking for a huckleberry like me. Lettuce, The Brothers Crenshaw who married beautiful twins. Rich, A counterfitter who tried to pass off a couple of his own. Hustlers, my breed. Now I been told that I played with a hayseed in my mouth but I don't remember it. For the first three or four weeks I was in town, Eddys opened at 11AM. They closed 2ish. I had a collection of long striped shirts and two pair of hip hugger checked pants which I rotated. 11:05 I stop in for breakfast and get to know the lunch crowd. Then off to the beach for a few hours to work on my California look. Back to Eddys, just a few blocks from the hookers and the beach. Afternoon free lunch, happy hour crowd. Of course I played a little pool by myself, drinking, being anti-social. Which is hard to imagine. Done with practice, more beers. Evening crowd at Eddys was a mad capp. They had lines of people out the door. There I was half hick, half unknown. It took a couple of days to find where and who I could lose too and gain show action. Like I said, I am not a world beater, but I like to play. For the dough. In my red striped, black stripped shirt. Checked blue, black, white. hip hugger pants. Tennis shoes and most of the time, occasionally, a hat. Hustlers dress in ways to bring around the bees, to drink the nectar. I gave up the stripes and checked and went with a more California shine dress after going to work. The Rennaisance Faire. I ended up in a job as one of their front men. There is a saying in hustling, A,B,C. Always be closing. If you expect to make a life of living off the land, then you have to have a mantra to live by. So I used my nefarious hustling abilities for Coat and tie meetings with the Golden Gate, Hiway Patrol, Railroads people. And then to the pool room, to the pool room. Always and foremost, the pool room where your true love waits. For about ten years, I played at Eddys as often as I could. The hustlers mentality is inside and outside. I didn't know crap about any of the things I was doing, but it wasn't much different than a new pool room. Keep em guessing.
I remember you with baggie pants that had a different color/patterned hem. Was I imagining that? I didn't know you until the early 90's so I'm sure I missed some good stuff, but you were/are a trip.
 

12squared

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Bill, I'm wondering if Fast Eddy's was the name of the room I played at a bunch of times in Sta Cruz when I lived up in Ben Lomand in '71-72? It was on a main drag, but I've long forgotten the street name. I was fresh from Tiff Payne's in N. Hyd, and could play a decent 3C game. I used to play the owner at the Sta Cruz joint for a few bucks and beers, because there weren't a lot of 3C players around then. The bucks I'd beat him for (usually) was my cigarette and booze money. They had a decent rock club in town at the time, so we were treated well.
I didn't know you were a 3-cushion player. Yay. I started playing at Tiff's the end of 76 when I moved to the Valley.
 

Scrzbill

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Bill, I'm wondering if Fast Eddy's was the name of the room I played at a bunch of times in Sta Cruz when I lived up in Ben Lomand in '71-72? It was on a main drag, but I've long forgotten the street name. I was fresh from Tiff Payne's in N. Hyd, and could play a decent 3C game. I used to play the owner at the Sta Cruz joint for a few bucks and beers, because there weren't a lot of 3C players around then. The bucks I'd beat him for (usually) was my cigarette and booze money. They had a decent rock club in town at the time, so we were treated well.
No Doc. Fast Eddys existence started in 1975 and no 3c.
 

gulfportdoc

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I didn't know you were a 3-cushion player. Yay. I started playing at Tiff's the end of 76 when I moved to the Valley.
Man, I loved that room! I hung out there continuously from '69-'70. My home poolroom had been Chopsticks Billiards on Victory in N. Hyd --where Hollywood Jack was houseman. I good very good a 9ball, but guys that played my speed all gambled, and I never had the money to spare to put into action. So I switched to snooker. But that ended up the same way. I lived at the top of Laurel Canyon on the Hyd side.

Finally I got interested in 3C after watching Al Gold (Gilbert) and a few other guys go at it. So I ended up going over to Tiff's (N Hyd Billiards), and I fell head over heels in love with 3C. I'd played it in college, and studied Hoppe's book, but the players at Tiff's were mostly top 'O the line. AND there were plenty of guys that would be willing to play gambling only for the table time. Despite having the best players on the West coast there (Gilbert, Frank Torres) there were very few money matches. At that time Tiff's and 3-4 other rooms in the Valley would have inexpensive handicapped 3C tournaments

Lots of great stories from that place, as I'm sure you have as well. Sadly the wife & I visited L.A. about 5 years ago, and I drove out past the old joint. The facade was still there, but it had long closed. Someone had turned it into a basic poolroom, and it gradually went down hill. Tiff's was wonderful because he had I think thirteen 3C tables in the back room, whereas pool and possibly snooker were restricted to the front. His crowds came from the billiard players. I couldn't get enough of that place! When I was on tour oftentimes I'd have one of Tiff's guys call and arrange a player my speed to play me where we were going to tour. Classy joint.
 

12squared

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Man, I loved that room! I hung out there continuously from '69-'70. My home poolroom had been Chopsticks Billiards on Victory in N. Hyd --where Hollywood Jack was houseman. I good very good a 9ball, but guys that played my speed all gambled, and I never had the money to spare to put into action. So I switched to snooker. But that ended up the same way. I lived at the top of Laurel Canyon on the Hyd side.

Finally I got interested in 3C after watching Al Gold (Gilbert) and a few other guys go at it. So I ended up going over to Tiff's (N Hyd Billiards), and I fell head over heels in love with 3C. I'd played it in college, and studied Hoppe's book, but the players at Tiff's were mostly top 'O the line. AND there were plenty of guys that would be willing to play gambling only for the table time. Despite having the best players on the West coast there (Gilbert, Frank Torres) there were very few money matches. At that time Tiff's and 3-4 other rooms in the Valley would have inexpensive handicapped 3C tournaments

Lots of great stories from that place, as I'm sure you have as well. Sadly the wife & I visited L.A. about 5 years ago, and I drove out past the old joint. The facade was still there, but it had long closed. Someone had turned it into a basic poolroom, and it gradually went down hill. Tiff's was wonderful because he had I think thirteen 3C tables in the back room, whereas pool and possibly snooker were restricted to the front. His crowds came from the billiard players. I couldn't get enough of that place! When I was on tour oftentimes I'd have one of Tiff's guys call and arrange a player my speed to play me where we were going to tour. Classy joint.
Yeah that room was great. I don't remember 13 3c tables in the back half, maybe 7 but everything else you said all sounds familiar. Not really a gambling room since primarily billiards room.

When I moved there Tiff gave me a job at the wax/polish factory he and a partner owned. (They OEMed one of Mother's car polish to give you an idea). And as a side note, his partner invented the bubble machine used in the Lawrence Well show.

One day I'll share a few stories with you, but once I started school in 77 I stopped going in there in a regular basis.
 

gulfportdoc

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Yeah that room was great. I don't remember 13 3c tables in the back half, maybe 7 but everything else you said all sounds familiar. Not really a gambling room since primarily billiards room.

When I moved there Tiff gave me a job at the wax/polish factory he and a partner owned. (They OEMed one of Mother's car polish to give you an idea). And as a side note, his partner invented the bubble machine used in the Lawrence Well show.

One day I'll share a few stories with you, but once I started school in 77 I stopped going in there in a regular basis.
Yeah, you might be right. There may have only been 9. I always remember things bigger than they were. I often played on the table by the men's room-- which is smart if you're drinking beer...:) I rarely played on the front two tables. Those were unofficially reserved for the good players.

Tiff was an interesting guy. Of course I never had any personal dealings with him. It was my understanding that he and his wife had been hoofers in older Hyd films. He attracted some interesting guys from the film business-- especially writers and technical people. There were a couple of comedy writers that frequented the place, who would keep everyone in stitches.
 

12squared

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Yeah, you might be right. There may have only been 9. I always remember things bigger than they were. I often played on the table by the men's room-- which is smart if you're drinking beer...:) I rarely played on the front two tables. Those were unofficially reserved for the good players.

Tiff was an interesting guy. Of course I never had any personal dealings with him. It was my understanding that he and his wife had been hoofers in older Hyd films. He attracted some interesting guys from the film business-- especially writers and technical people. There were a couple of comedy writers that frequented the place, who would keep everyone in stitches.
Speaking of keeping you in stiches, did you know Derek Knell?
 
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